ointment base


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base

 [bās]
1. the lowest part or foundation of anything. See also basis.
2. the main ingredient of a compound.
3. the nonacid part of a salt; a substance that combines with acids to form salts. In the chemical processes of the body, bases are essential to the maintenance of a normal acid-base balance. Excessive concentration of bases in the body fluids leads to alkalosis.
4. a unit of a removable dental prosthesis.
5. in genetics, a nucleotide, particularly one in a nucleic acid sequence.
intermediary base the layer of cement between a dental restoration and the tooth structure, acting as an insulator and protective barrier.
nitrogenous base an aromatic, nitrogen-containing molecule that serves as a proton acceptor, e.g., purine or pyrimidine.
ointment base a vehicle for the medicinal substances carried in an ointment.
purine b's a group of compounds of which purine is the base, including uric acid, adenine, xanthine, and theobromine.
Bases. A, Purine and some substituted purine bases occurring in nucleic acids. B, Pyrimidine and some substituted pyrimidine bases occurring in nucleic acids. From Dorland's, 2000.
pyrimidine b's a group of chemical compounds of which pyrimidine is the base, including uracil, thymine, and cytosine, which are common constituents of nucleic acids.

oint·ment base

the vehicle into which active ingredients may be incorporated. Petrolatum (which may be stiffened with wax) is the most widely used greasy ointment base and is suitable for the incorporation of oleaginous materials. Lanolin-containing bases will absorb water (and dissolved materials) and form water-in-oil type emulsions. Water soluble (washable) bases are often derived from polymers of ethylene glycol (PEGS); these will absorb water and ingredients dissolved in the water. Ointment bases are usually pharmacologically inert but may entrap water and serve to keep the skin from dying or to provide an emollient protective film.

oint·ment base

(oyntmĕnt bās)
Vehicle into which active ingredients may be incorporated. Petrolatum (which may be stiffened with wax) is the most widely used greasy ointment base and is suitable for the incorporation of oleaginous materials. Lanolin-containing bases absorb water (and dissolved materials) and form water-in-oil type emulsions. Water soluble (washable) bases, often derived from polymers of ethylene glycol (PEGs); absorb water and ingredients dissolved in it.
References in periodicals archive ?
The petroleum ether and ethanolic extracts were incorporated into ointment base in concentration of 2% and 5% (w/w) respectively.
Mice of the negative control group (group A) were treated with the simple ointment base. Groups B and C were treated with 5% (w/w) and 10% (w/w) of the EA fraction, respectively.
The test drugs and negative control (ointment base) were administered appropriately on the inoculation sites and were covered with sterilized gauze (1 x 1 cm size) and kept in place by the use of surgical tape and was left for 24-72 hours during which time the test animals were rendered immobile.
The ointment base of BV caused less irritation and no cortisol suppression but produced high skin infectivity.
The ointment base for Vusion is composed of zinc oxide and white petrolatum, which are the main components in most common diaper rash products.
Limited Tenders are invited for Supply of SHIELD OINTMENT 15 gm Lidocaine USP 3.0% w/w Hydrocortisone Acetate IP 0.25% w/w Zinc Oxide IP 5.0% w/w Allantoin BP 0.5% w/w Ointment Base QS.