ointment base


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base

 [bās]
1. the lowest part or foundation of anything. See also basis.
2. the main ingredient of a compound.
3. the nonacid part of a salt; a substance that combines with acids to form salts. In the chemical processes of the body, bases are essential to the maintenance of a normal acid-base balance. Excessive concentration of bases in the body fluids leads to alkalosis.
4. a unit of a removable dental prosthesis.
5. in genetics, a nucleotide, particularly one in a nucleic acid sequence.
intermediary base the layer of cement between a dental restoration and the tooth structure, acting as an insulator and protective barrier.
nitrogenous base an aromatic, nitrogen-containing molecule that serves as a proton acceptor, e.g., purine or pyrimidine.
ointment base a vehicle for the medicinal substances carried in an ointment.
purine b's a group of compounds of which purine is the base, including uric acid, adenine, xanthine, and theobromine.
Bases. A, Purine and some substituted purine bases occurring in nucleic acids. B, Pyrimidine and some substituted pyrimidine bases occurring in nucleic acids. From Dorland's, 2000.
pyrimidine b's a group of chemical compounds of which pyrimidine is the base, including uracil, thymine, and cytosine, which are common constituents of nucleic acids.

oint·ment base

the vehicle into which active ingredients may be incorporated. Petrolatum (which may be stiffened with wax) is the most widely used greasy ointment base and is suitable for the incorporation of oleaginous materials. Lanolin-containing bases will absorb water (and dissolved materials) and form water-in-oil type emulsions. Water soluble (washable) bases are often derived from polymers of ethylene glycol (PEGS); these will absorb water and ingredients dissolved in the water. Ointment bases are usually pharmacologically inert but may entrap water and serve to keep the skin from dying or to provide an emollient protective film.

ointment base

a vehicle for the medicinal substances carried in an ointment.

oint·ment base

(oyntmĕnt bās)
Vehicle into which active ingredients may be incorporated. Petrolatum (which may be stiffened with wax) is the most widely used greasy ointment base and is suitable for the incorporation of oleaginous materials. Lanolin-containing bases absorb water (and dissolved materials) and form water-in-oil type emulsions. Water soluble (washable) bases, often derived from polymers of ethylene glycol (PEGs); absorb water and ingredients dissolved in it.
References in periodicals archive ?
6% w/w), white petrolatum (15% w/w), and water (70% w/w); as well as a hydrophilic ointment base containing macrogol 4000 (20% w/w) and macrogol 600 (80% w/w) (Orafidiya et al.
The company's FDA Phase II clinical trial will be a double-blinded, placebo-controlled, dose range-finding trial with four arms looking at safety and efficacy of three doses of EISO in an ointment base.
The ointment base itself was acceptable but the incidence of skin infections was high.