oil gland

(redirected from oil glands)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to oil glands: sebaceous cyst

oil gland

n.
1. A gland, such as a sebaceous gland, that secretes an oily substance.

oil gland

Medspeak
Sebaceous glands; glandulae sebaceae [NA].
 
Zoology
The secretory unit in certain birds responsible for producing and deploying lipid moieties required for “waterproofing” water fowl.
References in periodicals archive ?
It physically shrinks the oil glands, making the pores smaller.
Hirtum, assessed by GC headspace analysis and by SPME sampling of individual oil glands. Phytochem Anal., 15: 286-292.
It is a diverse combination of blood vessels, hair follicles and sebaceous glands or oil glands. The proteins collagen and elastin are found in the dermis.
Unlike female skin, male skin has larger pores, a richer blood supply, and more active oil glands, so men are more prone to sweating.
On average, skin around the eyes is four times thinner than skin on the rest of the face and has few oil glands, leaving this delicate area especially vulnerable to moisture loss and environmental irritants.
Here's how it works: pores connect to oil glands under the skin by a canal called a follicle.
It is caused by inflammation of the small oil glands (sebaceous glands) that surround the fine hairs on the face and chest.
Studies reported by the American Academy of Dermatology show that PDT can shrink oil glands in acne patients, helping to improve scarring and skin texture and offering dermatologists the "first new therapies to treat acne in more than 20 years," according to one researcher.
This is often a problem during puberty (PYOO-bur-tee), because changes in body chemicals called hormones (HOR-monze) can increase the amount of sebum (SEE-bum) made by the skin's oil glands. If family members had acne, you may have a greater chance of getting pimples, blackheads, whiteheads, and cysts, too.
This area doesn't have oil glands, so needs special care such as Dr Sebagh's Eye Expert, left.
Because the anhinga lacks oil glands, its feathers can become waterlogged, and it has to dry off before it can fly.
"The enzymes necessary to convert these hormones to DHT are present right in the oil glands themselves," said Dr.