ohm

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Related to ohmic: ohmic loss, Ohmic device

ohm

 (Ω) [ōm]
the SI unit of electrical resistance, named for Georg Simon Ohm; one ohm is produced when a current of 1 ampere flowing through a conductor produces a potential difference of 1 volt. Impedance is also measured in ohms.

Ohm

(ōm),
Georg S., German physicist, 1787-1854. See: ohm, Ohm law.

ohm (Ω),

(ōm),
The practical unit of electrical resistance; the resistance of any conductor allowing 1 A of current to pass under the electromotive force of 1 V.
[George S. Ohm]

ohm

(Ω) (ōm) the SI unit of electrical resistance, being that of a resistor in which a current of 1 ampere is produced by a potential difference of 1 volt.

ohm (Ω)

Etymology: Georg S. Ohm, German physicist, 1787-1854
a unit of measurement of electric resistance. One ohm is the resistance of a conductor in which an electrical potential of 1 volt produces a current of 1 ampere. See also ampere, Ohm's law, volt, watt.

ohm

(Ω) (ōm)
The practical unit of electrical resistance; the resistance of any conductor allowing 1 ampere of current to pass under the electromotive force of 1 volt.
[George S. Ohm]

Ohm,

Georg Simon, German physicist, 1787-1854.
ohm - the practical unit of electrical resistance.
Ohm law - in an electric current passing through a wire, the intensity of the current in amperes equals the electromotive force in volts divided by the resistance in ohms.

ohm

the SI unit of electrical resistance, being that of a resistor in which a current of 1 ampere is produced by a potential difference of 1 volt. Symbol Ω.
References in periodicals archive ?
A two-dimensional computational proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) model is presented to investigate the effects of operating parameters such as overall ohmic resistance, cathode side charge transfer coefficient, operating pressure, and fuel cell temperature on PEMFCs.
As in the case of the loading at 5% w/w the ohmic conductivity masks the dipolar loss peak.
The currents induced in these structures cause heating and the ohmic heating associated with these structures is called "stray loss.
3 mm/s at the electrode edges), owing to the larger separation between neighbouring electrodes, resulting in weaker temperature (thermal increase due to ohmic heating ~ 0.
In a recent study, the scientists applied pulsed ohmic heating to pasteurize milk.
6) Ohmic characteristics: An electric property found in metals in which the electric current is proportionate to the applied voltage.
If the voltage pulse width is very short, the erosion takes place very close to the tool (red part in Figure 1), since the ohmic resistance of the electrolyte prevents ablation at areas further away of the tool (blue part) due to the double layer capacitor cannot be sufficiently recharged.
An additional advantage of the Ag wire pseudo-reference electrode was its small size, permitting placement very near the working electrode surface, thus minimizing ohmic polarization without significantly blocking current (hence, deposition of polymer) at the working electrode.
Other subjects covered are computation methods and thermal properties correlation in freezing and thawing of foods, microwave and radio frequency in sterilization and pasteurization, ohmic heating models and measurements, deep-fat frying, and heat and mass transfer during baking.
He was one of the leaders of the world fusion research effort during the 1950s and illuminated many aspects of the pinch effect, especially the limitations on ohmic heating and current in pinch discharges.
2) However, for RF devices such as the micromachined tunable capacitor, ohmic loss must be minimized and a high quality (Q-value) must be achieved.