frequency

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frequency

 [fre´kwen-se]
1. the number of occurrences of a periodic or recurrent process in a unit of time, such as the number of electrical cycles per second measured in hertz. In cardiac pacing terminology, frequency is expressed by the formula: frequency = ½ × pulse width.
2. the number of occurrences of a particular event or the number of members of a population or statistical sample falling in a particular class.
radio frequency the range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation between 10 kilohertz and 100 gigahertz, used for radio communication.
relative frequency the ratio of the number of occurrences of a specified phenomenon in a population to the total size of the population.
urinary frequency urination at short intervals without increase in daily volume of urinary output, due to reduced bladder capacity or cystitis.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

fre·quen·cy (ν),

(frē'kwen-sē),
The number of regular recurrences in a given time, for example, heartbeats, sound vibrations.
[L. frequens, repeated, often, constant]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

frequency

The number of cycles or repetitions of a periodic wave or signal per unit time. In electromagnetic radiation, frequency is usually expressed in units of hertz (Hz), where 1 Hz = 1 cycle per second.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

frequency

Statistics The number of times that a particular periodic event occurs in a unit time. See Collision frequency, Cumulative frequency, Larmor frequency, Observed frequency, Order frequency, Pulse repetition, Recombination frequency, Relative frequency.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

fre·quen·cy

(ν) (frē'kwĕn-sē)
1. The number of regular recurrences in a given time, e.g., heartbeats, sound vibrations.
2. acoustics the number of cycles of compression and rarefaction of a sound wave that occur in 1 second, expressed in hertz (Hz).
3. The rate of vocal fold vibration (i.e., the number of times the glottis opens and closes in 1 second) during phonation; perceived as voice pitch.
[L. frequens, repeated, often, constant]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

frequency

An informal term referring to the condition in which urine is passed more often than normal (frequency of urination). Frequency may be due to excessive fluid intake, bladder infection, pregnancy, the use of DIURETIC drugs, or, in men, to an enlarged prostate gland obstructing the urinary outflow so that the bladder can only be partially emptied. Frequency is occasionally of psychological origin.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Frequency

Sound, whether traveling through air or the human body, produces vibrations—molecules bouncing into each other—as the shock wave travels along. The frequency of a sound is the number of vibrations per second. Within the audible range, frequency means pitch—the higher the frequency, the higher a sound's pitch.
Mentioned in: Abdominal Ultrasound
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

fre·quen·cy

(frē'kwĕn-sē)
The number of regular recurrences in a given time, e.g., heartbeats, sound vibrations.
[L. frequens, repeated, often, constant]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about frequency

Q. What foods or liquids, juices, proteins, fruits, are good for Male Prostate or Urinary Frequency? I am 53 YO Male with exessive urinary frequency. Is there a fruit, food, drink, pill, mojo, that would help me with this problem? I am talking about urinating 3 to 4 times every night, and or while watching TV, every hour or so. No pain, yet, an occacional after drip that is very anoying. Perhaps I have a prostate problem and should consuld with my Urologist. Yet, before I go there, does anyone know of something I can eat or drink to fix or aleviate this problem?

A. Thanks for the heads-up. One of my issues is that I LOVE coffee, thus, reducing my daily consumption of 2-3 cups could be a problem.

More discussions about frequency
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References in classic literature ?
It has often been assumed that man has chosen for domestication animals and plants having an extraordinary inherent tendency to vary, and likewise to withstand diverse climates.
It has often been loosely said that all our races of dogs have been produced by the crossing of a few aboriginal species; but by crossing we can get only forms in some degree intermediate between their parents; and if we account for our several domestic races by this process, we must admit the former existence of the most extreme forms, as the Italian greyhound, bloodhound, bull-dog, in the wild state.
After some time spent in peeping, grinning, and chattering, he at last espied me; and reaching one of his paws in at the door, as a cat does when she plays with a mouse, although I often shifted place to avoid him, he at length seized the lappet of my coat (which being made of that country silk, was very thick and strong), and dragged me out.
He pressed his finger on his lip, and drew the child along by narrow courts and winding ways, nor did he seem at ease until they had left it far behind, often casting a backward look towards it, murmuring that ruin and self-murder were crouching in every street, and would follow if they scented them; and that they could not fly too fast.
There had been an old copy of the Pilgrim's Progress, with strange plates, upon a shelf at home, over which she had often pored whole evenings, wondering whether it was true in every word, and where those distant countries with the curious names might be.
They were now in the open country; the houses were very few and scattered at long intervals, often miles apart.
They often stopped to rest, but only for a short space at a time, and still kept on, having had but slight refreshment since the morning.
He had been in London many a time--used to go there often once, with waggons.
The study, conducted by researchers from the University of California at Los Angeles and other institutions, found that the amount of fear and avoidance people experience is often heightened if they belong to a vulnerable population group, such as those who are physically disabled, have a mental illness or are part of certain racial or ethnic minority groups.
The murderer is most often the husband, who is taking care of his wife who has a chronic illness, often Alzheimer's disease.
By the 1830s formal indented craft apprentices were increasingly rare in the United States, but the courts, often without regard to parental opinion, continued to bind poor free boys and girls as "apprentices." Not surprisingly, actual practices also often involved race and gender issues.