officinalis

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officinalis

(ŏ-fis″ĭ-nā′lis) [L. officinalis, pert. to a workshop, storeroom, pharmacy]
Part of the scientific name of a species pert. to a plant or herb traditionally sold in pharmacies, readily available without special preparation, and considered to have medicinal properties, e.g., Calendula officinalis, the pot marigold.
officinale (ŏ-fis″ĭ-nā′lē), adjective

officinalis (ōˈ·fi·sē·näˑ·lis),

adj status of a substance approved of and dispensed by apothecaries.
References in periodicals archive ?
Zingiber officinale, commonly known as ginger is recognized throughout history for its therapeutic properties (Bode and Zong 2011).
An infusion of Zingiber officinale radix (ginger, fresh rhizome) and Matricaria chamomilla flos (german chamomile, dried flowers) was also taken at this time pro re nata (PRN) for anti-inflammatory and spasmolytic activity, (17) with the patient's bowel movements normalising within 3 hours and continuing to be normalised throughout his convalescence.
Nasturtium officinale occurred in more isolated patches on the downstream end of cobble bars and was typically associated with springs or seeps.
Rhizomes of Zingiber officinale (ginger) were collected from a local market in Dhaka city, Bangladesh during June 2013.
Des concertations sur la baisse annoncee fin juillet dernier de 30 a 40 pc des prix des medicaments au Maroc ont eu lieu, mardi a Rabat, dans le cadre d'une reunion ayant regroupe autour des responsables du ministere de la Sante l'ensemble des instances representatives de la profession officinale (Conseil de l'Ordre et Syndicats officinaux).
Summer - cytisus battandieri, jasminum officinale, roses and philadelphus.
9) Cover the rhizomes of Zingiber officinale in a layer of number 8 for a real Christmas evening treat.
2004) Anti-diabetic activity of Zingiber officinale in Streptozotocin-induced type I diabetic rats.
Ginger, Zingiber officinale, is a widely used therapeutic food and herb.
Ginger extract is derived from the dried rhizomes of Zingiber officinale, standardized for 35% gingerols and is well documented in Ayurvedic medicine for its anti-inflammatory properties.
officinale and other epiphytic Dendrobium species provides an interesting opportunity to compare the dependency of epipbytic orchids on mycorrhizal fungi with those of terrestrial orchids.