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BEAM

 
brain electric activity map; trademark name for a map of brainwave activity derived from a computerized enhancement of electroencephalographic records.

beam

 [bēm]
a unidirectional, or approximately unidirectional, emission of electromagnetic radiation or particles.
useful beam in radiology, that part of the primary radiation that is permitted to emerge from the tubehead assembly of an x-ray machine, as limited by the aperture or port and accessory collimating devices.
beam splitter a device that reflects light from the output phosphor of an image intensifier to a photographic recording. Called also image distributor.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

beam

(bēm),
1. Any bar the curvature of which changes under load; in dentistry, frequently used instead of "bar."
2. A collimated emission of light or other radiation, such as an x-ray beam.
[O.H.G. Boum]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

beam

Drug slang
A regional synonym for cocaine.
 
Radiation oncology
A focused stream of particles or electromagnetic radiation which is focused in a single direction or body region as part of a therapeutic regimen.

BEAM

Abbreviation for:
BCNU, etoposide, cytarabine, melphalan (a chemotherapy regimen)
Biomedical Equipment Assessment & Management (Medspeak-UK)
brain electrical activity mapping
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

beam

(bēm)
1. Any bar with a curvature that changes under load.
2. dentistry Synonym(s): bar (2) .
3. A collimated emission of light or other radiation, such as an x-ray beam.
[O.H.G. Boum]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

beam

(bēm)
1. Any bar the curvature of which changes under load; in dentistry, frequently used instead of "bar."
2. A collimated emission of light or other radiation.
[O.H.G. Boum]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Off beam: Mark Burchill fires his penalty against a post while (inset) grounded Steven Robb can't believe another miss
A IT'S a well-known fact that nits prefer clean hair to that which is dirty - so your mum is way off beam.
Berwick MP Alan Beith says the Government's interpretation of "rural" is way off beam and wants action.
The absurd idea from the IoD that the loss of a major exporter can be offset by the creation of another import-sucking shopping centre shows how off beam they are.
Seems I wasn't too off beam predicting the possibility of a libidinous Timelord.
THERE really is no such thing as bad publicity and suggestions that Janet Jackson's career might be nipped in the bud by her Superbowl peek-a-boo show are way off beam.
But champions rarely go down without a fight and Agassi, whose radar for the tramlines had been way off beam, dug himself in with a mixture of desperation and resolve.
It now looks like Andy Warhol was way off beam: ``In the future, everybody will be famous for 15 minutes''?
Tuning in to BBC WM the other day, I heard him engaged in a tedious discussion about investing in wine - an idea way off beam for the station's mainly working class audience.
But the Lord's slope is an unforgiving place for fast bowlers, and if your rhythm is only one per cent out of kilter it can throw you completely off beam.
Off beam: Mark Burchill fires his penalty against a post while (inset) grounded Noel Hunt can't believe another miss