choice

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choice

A popular term referring to the freedom to choose, a process that assesses alternative sources of information and options.
References in periodicals archive ?
Assuming that brute desires can be justifying grounds of choice, that in virtue of which they justify can be an absolute consideration--namely, the fact that the choice is of absolute trivial significance.
Chesterton wrote of his friend and opponent Bernard Shaw that he "is like the Venus of Milo; all that there is of him is admirable' One could say the same of The Education Gap with this twist: what is well presented of the "statue" of choice are her amiable extremities--arms from an otherwise missing figure.
Changing the cultural and institutional structures that reinforce school assignment is one crucial element for expanding the number of choices available to students and their families.
At no time in recent memory has the philosophy of choice and liberty divided women and their allies so much as in that brand currently espoused by women like Madonna, Camille Paglia, and even feminist author Naomi Wolf.
Perhaps we need to find out what kinds of choices, in what areas of life, actually promote freedom, and what kinds of choices restrict it.
They're the kind of choices where some interests win and some interests lose.
The counselor would facilitate the decisionmaking process by presenting the full range of choices available, assess the contributions that each good or service might make to the VR process, and provide timely opinion as choices were made.
Congress will also pass, and President Clinton will sign, the Freedom of Choice Act to protect abortion rights from adverse state action.
"As the number of choices keeps growing, negative aspects of having a multitude of options begin to appear," writes Swarthmore psychologist Barry Schwartz in The Paradox of Choice, published in January 2004.
Hess's second case study focuses on the five-year-old voucher plan in Cleveland, where he finds that the potential benefits of choice and competition were neutralized by multiple factors, including frequent changes in leadership, the state's move to take over the city's schools, the modest size of the vouchers (only $2,250), and the existence of strong unions.
They must deal with the moral question wrapped up in the feminist ethos of "a woman's body, a woman's right." Specifically, they must deal with the issue of choice, the right of every woman to decide for herself what medical procedures she wishes to undergo.
It has scored victories--the state of Wisconsin agreed to let parents in some poor parts of Milwaukee choose private schools, and variations of choice among public schools are gaining approval around the country--but never a straight-out endorsement at the polls.