occupation

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Related to of Japan: Emperor of Japan

occupation

an activity that has unique meaning and purpose for a person.

oc·cu·pa·tion

(ok'yū-pā'shŭn)
The activity that constitutes the social contribution one makes, for which some sort of compensation may generally be received.

occupation

(ok″yŭ-pā′shŏn)
1. Any goal-directed pursuit in which one works for a wage, salary, or other income.
2. Any goal-directed use of time.
3. Any activity or pursuit in which one is engaged outside one's work, e.g., a hobby or sport.

secondary occupation

Employment in addition to that for which one is primarily hired.
References in periodicals archive ?
By borrowing yen with near-zero financing costs, hedge funds and private equity are chasing stocks, commodities, currencies, and real estate both inside and outside of Japan.
China, South Korea, and other nations once colonized by Emperor Hirohito's legions remain extremely wary of Japan developing into a true military power.
68) Even more absurd was the fact that the Bank of Japan discovered that it did not have enough paper with which to print the new notes.
The bubbles burst in 1989, after the Bank of Japan raised interest rates, slashing liquidity growth and making it impossible for banks to keep pushing money out the door.
in the area of aid policy," quoting the White Paper on ODA of Japan as follows; " .
Furthermore, the pair found that YAP-positive chromosomes appeared with much greater frequency in the southern islands of Japan than in the country's main islands.
Former Bank of Japan Governor Masaru Hayami, among others, would point to specific price drops, like those prompted by new imports to Japan of cheap clothing, and say that this constituted "good deflation" and thus confuse the public.
And perhaps most important, deflation shows signs of easing thanks to aggressive monetary stimulus by the Bank of Japan.
Have twelve years of Japan banging its head against a brick wall not been proof enough of a failed policy?
The Japanese have been led to believe they must sacrifice for the survival of Japan," says William Hudson Jr.