oestrogen


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es·tro·gen

(es'trō-jen),
Generic term for any substance, natural or synthetic, that exerts biologic effects characteristic of estrogenic hormones such as 17β-estradiol. Estrogens are formed by the ovary, placenta, testes, and possibly the adrenal cortex, as well as by certain plants; they stimulate secondary sexual characteristics, and exert systemic effects, such as growth and maturation of long bones, and are used therapeutically in any disorder attributable to estrogen deficiency or amenable to estrogen therapy, such as menstrual disorders and menopausal problems. They control the course of the menstrual cycle.
Synonym(s): estrin, oestrogen
[G. oistrus, -heat, estrus, + -gen, producing]

oestrogen

(ĕs′trə-jən)
n.
Variant of estrogen.

oestrogen

The steroid molecule which is the primary female sex hormone. It diffuses across cell membranes, and, once inside the cell, binds and activates oestrogen receptors, leading to modulation of the expression of a range of genes.

Pronunciation
Medspeak-UK: pronounced, EE stroh jenn
Medspeak-US: pronounced, ESS troh jenn

es·tro·gen

(es'trŏ-jen)
Generic term for any substance, natural or synthetic, which exerts biologic effects characteristic of estrogenic hormones; formed by the ovary, placenta, testes, and possibly the cortex of the suprarenal gland, as well as by some plants; stimulates secondary sexual characteristics and exerts systemic effects, such as growth and maturation of long bones; until recently, given after menopause or oophorectomy to prevent heart attack and prevent osteoporosis; also used to prevent or stop lactation, suppress ovulation, and palliate carcinoma of the breast and prostate.
Synonym(s): oestrogen.
[G. oistrus, -heat, estrus, + -gen, producing]

oestrogen

One of a group of steroid sex hormones secreted mainly by the ovaries, but also by the testicles. Oestrogens bring about the development of the female secondary sexual characteristics and act on the lining of the uterus, in conjunction with progesterone, to prepare it for implantation of the fertilized OVUM. They have some ANABOLIC properties and promote bone growth. Oestrogens are used to treat ovarian insufficiency and menopausal symptoms, to limit postmenopausal OSTEOPOROSIS, to stop milk production (lactation) and to treat widespread cancers of the PROSTATE gland. They are extensively used as oral contraceptives. Brand names are Premarin and, with Norgestrel, Prempac-C.

oestrogen

or

estrogen

a hormone produced by the OVARY of the female vertebrate which maintains the female SECONDARY SEXUAL CHARACTERS and is involved in the repair of the uterine wall after menstruation (see MENSTRUAL CYCLE). It is also produced by the PLACENTA during pregnancy, and in small quantities by the ADRENAL CORTEX and the male TESTIS.

es·tro·gen

(es'trŏ-jen)
Generic term for any substance, natural or synthetic, which exerts biologic effects characteristic of estrogenic hormones; formed by the ovary, placenta, testes, and possibly the cortex of the suprarenal gland, as well as by some plants; stimulates secondary sexual characteristics and exerts systemic effects, such as growth and maturation of long bones; also used to prevent or stop lactation, suppress ovulation, and palliate carcinoma of the breast and prostate.
Synonym(s): oestrogen.
[G. oistrus, -heat, estrus, + -gen, producing]
References in periodicals archive ?
This knowledge improves the prospects of being able to develop new, safer oestrogen treatments in the future.
"The development of special oestrogens that are tailored to bone and only affect a particular part of this type of oestrogen receptor may lead to a more targeted and effective treatment for osteoporosis with minimal side-effects," said Prof Claes Ohlsson.
Treatment of osteoporosis with oestrogens is, however, linked to serious side-effects such as breast cancer and blood clots.
Paganini-Hill A, Ross RK, Henderson BE: Postmenopausal oestrogen treatment and stroke: A prospective study.
Armstrong BK: Oestrogen therapy after the menopause-Boon or bane?
36, Collins J, Donner A, Allen LH, et al: Oestrogen use and survival in endometrial cancer.
The research team compared a high 30-milligram daily dose of oestrogen to a low 6-milligram daily dose, and evaluated how well the treatments controlled the women's metastatic cancers, and how the treatments affected their quality of life.
Conducting standard positron emission tomography (PET) scans before oestrogen treatment and 24 hours later, they observed that metastatic tumors that glowed more brightly after oestrogen was started were much more likely to be affected by oestrogen therapy.