oesophagus

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Related to oesophaguses: gullet

oesophagus

(ĭ-sŏf′ə-gəs)
n.
Variant of esophagus.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

oesophagus

The tubular segment of the upper gastrointestinal tract which connects the mouth with the stomach, spelled oesophagus in the UK and esophagus in the US.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

oesophagus

British spelling for esophagus, see there.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

e·soph·a·gus

, pl. esophagi (ĕ-sof'ă-gŭs, -jī) [TA]
The portion of the digestive canal between the pharynx and stomach. It is about 25 cm long and consists of three parts: the cervical, from the cricoid cartilage to the thoracic inlet; the thoracic, from the thoracic inlet to the diaphragm; and the abdominal, below the diaphragm to the cardiac opening of the stomach.
Synonym(s): oesophagus.
[G. oisophagos, gullet]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

oesophagus

The gullet. The oesophagus is a muscular tube, about 24 cm long, extending from the throat (pharynx) to the STOMACH. Just above the stomach it passes through the DIAPHRAGM. In swallowing, food is carried down by repetitive controlled contractions of the muscular walls, known as PERISTALSIS. Immediately above the stomach the wall of the oesophagus shows an increased tendency to contract, thus forming a muscle ring known as the cardiac SPHINCTER. This normally closes after swallowing, to prevent regurgitation of the stomach contents.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

oesophagus

the part of the alimentary canal of vertebrates that lies between the PHARYNX and the STOMACH. No digestive juices are produced here, but PERISTALSIS takes place, often moving the bolus upwards from the lowered head to the stomach.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

e·soph·a·gus

, pl. esophagi (ĕ-sof'ă-gŭs, -jī) [TA]
Portion of alimentary canal between pharynx and stomach. It is about 25-cm long and consists of three parts: the cervical part, from the cricoid cartilage to the thoracic inlet; the thoracic part, from the thoracic inlet to the diaphragm; and the abdominal part, below the diaphragm to the cardiac opening of the stomach.
[G. oisophagos, gullet]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about oesophagus

Q. do we need the esophagus to live? If we were to take our esophagus away would we still live?

A. Principally, yes. Feeding can be done through a hole in the stomach (PEG). Life is possible this way, although one may argue about the quality of life in this situation.

Q. Cn barret esophagous be cured? I was diagnosed with barretts esophagus several years ago, and so far keeps on the routine follow up. I met some other guy with same condition and he told after his doctor prescribed him with some anti-reflux meds, in the last endoscopy they found normal esophagus, and that he thinks he's now cured. Is that possible?

A. Anti-reflux treatment may lower the risk of cancer a little, but it won't cure it, so there's still a need for refular follow-up.

More discussions about oesophagus
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