oesophagus


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oesophagus

(ĭ-sŏf′ə-gəs)
n.
Variant of esophagus.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

oesophagus

The tubular segment of the upper gastrointestinal tract which connects the mouth with the stomach, spelled oesophagus in the UK and esophagus in the US.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

oesophagus

British spelling for esophagus, see there.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

e·soph·a·gus

, pl. esophagi (ĕ-sof'ă-gŭs, -jī) [TA]
The portion of the digestive canal between the pharynx and stomach. It is about 25 cm long and consists of three parts: the cervical, from the cricoid cartilage to the thoracic inlet; the thoracic, from the thoracic inlet to the diaphragm; and the abdominal, below the diaphragm to the cardiac opening of the stomach.
Synonym(s): oesophagus.
[G. oisophagos, gullet]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

oesophagus

The gullet. The oesophagus is a muscular tube, about 24 cm long, extending from the throat (pharynx) to the STOMACH. Just above the stomach it passes through the DIAPHRAGM. In swallowing, food is carried down by repetitive controlled contractions of the muscular walls, known as PERISTALSIS. Immediately above the stomach the wall of the oesophagus shows an increased tendency to contract, thus forming a muscle ring known as the cardiac SPHINCTER. This normally closes after swallowing, to prevent regurgitation of the stomach contents.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

oesophagus

the part of the alimentary canal of vertebrates that lies between the PHARYNX and the STOMACH. No digestive juices are produced here, but PERISTALSIS takes place, often moving the bolus upwards from the lowered head to the stomach.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

e·soph·a·gus

, pl. esophagi (ĕ-sof'ă-gŭs, -jī) [TA]
Portion of alimentary canal between pharynx and stomach. It is about 25-cm long and consists of three parts: the cervical part, from the cricoid cartilage to the thoracic inlet; the thoracic part, from the thoracic inlet to the diaphragm; and the abdominal part, below the diaphragm to the cardiac opening of the stomach.
[G. oisophagos, gullet]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about oesophagus

Q. do we need the esophagus to live? If we were to take our esophagus away would we still live?

A. Principally, yes. Feeding can be done through a hole in the stomach (PEG). Life is possible this way, although one may argue about the quality of life in this situation.

Q. Cn barret esophagous be cured? I was diagnosed with barretts esophagus several years ago, and so far keeps on the routine follow up. I met some other guy with same condition and he told after his doctor prescribed him with some anti-reflux meds, in the last endoscopy they found normal esophagus, and that he thinks he's now cured. Is that possible?

A. Anti-reflux treatment may lower the risk of cancer a little, but it won't cure it, so there's still a need for refular follow-up.

More discussions about oesophagus
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References in periodicals archive ?
CANCER DEATHSThe National Cancer Control Programme data shows that in 2018, there were 4,351 deaths due to oesophagus cancer, accounting for 13.5 per cent of the total cancer deaths.This was followed by cervix uteri cancer at 3,286 (10 per cent), breast cancer came third at 2,553 (7.7 per cent), stomach (2,068), prostrate (1,663), colorectum (1,463) and liver cancer (1,331) in 2018.
The surgical management of corrosive oesophageal stricture involves bypass or resection of a scarred oesophagus and replacement with a conduit (1,2).
The team used a rat oesophagus, which was stripped of its cells, leaving behind a collagen scaffold.
After examining the child and seeing the barium swallow X-ray, the doctors found he had a severely narrowed lower-end of oesophagus with the contrast barely entering the stomach, the hospital said.
"Acid reflux and GORD (gastrooesophageal reflux disease) are the two main causes of Barrett's oesophagus. Acid reflux is when stomach acid splashes back into the oesophagus.
Trachea was retreated to the right and identified oesophagus with foreign body, the oesophagus was incised longitudinally just anterior to foreign body and a chicken bone obstructing the lumen was removed.
Barrett's oesophagus often goes undiagnosed, making it difficult to identify those people who are at higher risk of going on to develop oesophageal cancer.
On biopsy, IM is the diagnostic feature of BO when located in the oesophagus, not when located in the upper part of the stomach.
However, in some cases with a fistula between the oesophagus and the cyst, it is necessary to leave a small amount of cyst tissue close the fistula in place.
Black oesophagus: a rare disorder with potentially fatal outcome: a forensic pathological approach based on five autopsy cases.
"The girl, who was born with a defect in the oesophagus, had been earlier treated at a private hospital but the operation was not successful.