oesophageal varices

e·soph·a·ge·al va·ri·ces

(ĕ-sof'ă-jē'ăl var'i-sēz)
Longitudinal venous varices at the lower end of the esophagus as a result of portal hypertension; they are superficial and liable to ulceration and massive bleeding.
Synonym(s): oesophageal varices.

oesophageal varices

Varicose veins, often large, occurring at the lower end of the gullet (oesophagus) in conditions such as CIRRHOSIS of the liver in which there is severe restriction to the flow of blood from the intestine to the liver in the PORTAL VEIN. Such varices may bleed dangerously and this is treated by means of compression with a balloon and by injections which cause the blood in the veins to clot.

e·soph·a·ge·al va·ri·ces

(ĕ-sof'ă-jē'ăl var'i-sēz)
Longitudinal venous varices at lower end of esophagus as a result of portal hypertension; superficial and liable to ulceration and massive bleeding.
References in periodicals archive ?
Portal hypertension (PH) and bleeding oesophageal varices is the most common clinical presentation or complication of CHF.
About 50% of children with EHPVO present with bleeding from oesophageal varices. (1-3) Improvements in the management of children with intrahepatic disease have led to increased survival, consequently contributing to the long-term burden of portal hypertension.
His supervisor was Bert Myburgh, and the thesis was entitled 'The effect of distal splenorenal shunting on hepatic perfusion and function of patients with bleeding oesophageal varices in schistosomiasis'.
They are swollen, irregularly shaped, twisted and distorted veins which most commonly occur in the legs but can happen elsewhere, such as the lower end of the gullet (oesophageal varices) and in veins from the testicles (varicocoele).
Conclusion: The presence of an enlarged spleen is a valid predictor of the presence of oesophageal varices in patients suffering with liver cirrhosis.
When the portal vein pressure increases to a certain degree, oesophageal varices can occur, while, in severe cases, oesophageal variceal bleeding will emerge, which is the most common and severe complication of cirrhosis and cirrhotic portal hypertension, as well as the most common cause of death for cirrhosis [1].
It is defined as elevation of hepatic venous pressure gradient more than 5 mmHg and is caused by increased intrahepatic resistance to blood flow due to loss of liver architecture in cirrhosis which ultimately leads to splenomegaly, ascites and oesophageal varices. Dib et al [1] showed oesophageal varices were developed when portal vein diameter exceeds 13 mm.
Non-invasive Diagnosis of Oesophageal Varices Using Systemic Haemodynamic Measurements by Finometry: Comparison with Other Non-invasive Predictive Scores.
A study that assessed 78 cirrhotic patients without oesophageal varices (EV) using oesophageal manometry and simultaneous 24hour pH study reported increased frequency of abnormal reflux episodes (55%) and reflux oesophagitis (37%) compared to 30 healthy controls [1].
The presence of ascites and oesophageal varices were determined at admission and on subsequent visits.
(4,9) There is consensus that assessment of intervention efficacy in cirrhotic patients with portal hypertension and bleeding oesophageal varices should be based on the control of bleeding and the risks of rebleeding and death as the 3 major outcomes.
Bleeding from oesophageal varices is the most serious complication of portal hypertension and accounts for most cirrhosis-related deaths.