oedipal


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oedipal

 [ed´ĭ-pal]
pertaining to the Oedipus complex.

oedipal

also

Oedipal

(ĕd′ə-pəl, ē′də-)
adj.
Of, relating to, or characteristic of the Oedipus complex: oedipal conflicts.

oed′i·pal·ly adv.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bank and Kahn (1982) criticised the classic psychoanalytical understanding of sibling relationships in which siblings of the same sex served as rivals for parental love and siblings of opposite sex served as displacements for oedipal desires.
The oedipal stage is the point in development at which mother and daughter begin the psychological separation.
Not only that he causes separation, or that he establishes the Law, but that he is the one taking care of Duchess echoes the same intersubjective relations revolving around the Oedipal complex.
The triangular relationship among the main characters in Chua fa din salai may not immediately remind one of an Oedipal structure since Phapo is Sangmong's uncle rather than his father and Yupphadi his aunt by marriage rather than his mother.
In terms of the Oedipal crisis and its resolution the fantasy of the pre-Oedipal mother is a regressive step as Coraline soon finds out.
To better grasp the oedipal dynamics of The Ambassadors it is important to recognize that Strether, although middle aged and literally fatherless, engages in a battle against paternal authority when he takes his journey to Europe.
It is only when Berta arrives at the end of the first act that Alfredo abandons his narcissism and turns to rebellion against the paternal order in the form of Oedipal desire.
A related objection applies to Buchanan's accounting for Lawrence's hostility toward psychoanalytic interpretations as his way of deflecting his own psychological hang-ups: "[R]ather than gouge his own eyes out, Lawrence attacked Freud for popularizing a caricatured version of Oedipal identity." In fact, Lawrence's anger was mainly directed at what he considered the reductive impact of such readings precisely on the emotional and psychological complexities he felt he had embodied in his fiction.
Trough an exegesis of biblical sources and commentaries, we shall try to understand Reuben's behavior and how the psychological dynamics resonate within him as he attempts to resolve his Oedipal issues.
Deleuze himself had no time for Madame Bovary's OEdipal entanglements.
A more careful reading of Bassani's book would challenge this Oedipal account of the narrator, Micol, and the novel itself.
Following the modern interpretation of the Oedipal myth suggested by Freud, one can find explicit and implicit allusion to it in the films of Alfred Hitchcock, Woody Allen, Steven Spielberg, and many more (Winkler).