odontoma

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Related to odontomas: Odontogenic keratocyst

odontoma

 [o″don-to´mah]
any odontogenic tumor, especially a composite odontoma.
ameloblastic odontoma a rare, slow-growing, mixed tumor of odontogenic origin that combines the characteristics of composite odontoma and ameloblastoma.
composite odontoma one consisting of both enamel and dentin in an abnormal pattern.
radicular odontoma one associated with a tooth root, or formed when the root was developing.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

o·don·to·ma

(ō'don-tō'mă),
1. A tumor of odontogenic origin.
2. A hamartomatous odontogenic tumor composed of enamel, dentin, cementum, and pulp tissue that may or may not be arranged in the form of a tooth.
[odonto- + G. -oma, tumor]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

odontoma

A tumor of odontogenic origin–ie, which arises from the dental epithelium. See Complex odontoma, Compound odontoma.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

o·don·to·ma

(ō'don-tō'mă)
1. A tumor of odontogenic origin.
2. A hamartomatous odontogenic tumor composed of enamel, dentin, cementum, and pulp tissue that may or may not be arranged in the form of a tooth.
[odonto- + G. -oma, tumor]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

o·don·to·ma

(ō'don-tō'mă)
1. Tumor of odontogenic origin.
2. Hamartomatous odontogenic tumor composed of enamel, dentin, cementum, and pulp tissue that may or may not be arranged in the form of a tooth.
[odonto- + G. -oma, tumor]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Clinically, odontoma has two subtypes: complex or compound.
Multiple compound odontomas in the jaw: case report and analysis of the literature.
Odontomas have been associated with trauma during primary dentition, inflammatory and infectious processes, hereditary anomalies (Gardner syndrome and Hermann syndrome), and odontoblasts hyperactivity, and alterations in the genetic components are responsible for controlling dental development.
This characteristic was observed in three cysts; two of them were associated with odontomas and the other was an extraosseous variant.
Conservative surgery is an adequate treatment for odontomas. Recurrence is not observed when they are completely removed.
Odontomas are generally diagnosed during explorations because of a delay tooth eruptions or incidentally on control radiographs in the first two decades with no specific gender prediction (3,4).
(2001) attributed canine transmigration to the presence of odontomas, as well as in our case where bilateral mandibular canine transmigration can be attributed to the persistence of temporal canines associated with odontomas located at the apex level.
Initially it was termed as ameloblastic odontoma, but due to its exceptional mixed nature of growth and incidence of two types of odontogenic tumours with diverse histological and biologic behavior, World Health Organization (WHO) suggested this term to be inappropriate.
Al analizar la frecuencia de presentacion de los diferentes tipos histologicos de los TOB, en diversos estudios realizados en diferentes paises del mundo se encontro: Elarbi y colaboradores [6] reportaron en Libia, a 17 anos, con un universo de 213 casos y un diagnostico de TOB para 35 casos (16,4%) que, de estos, el TOB mas frecuente fue: odontomas (25,71%), seguido del TOQQ (20%).
Ameloblastic odontomas can be classified into ameloblastic fibro-odontoma and odonto-ameloblastoma.