odontology

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Related to odontologist: Forensic odontology, forensic dentistry

odontology

 [o″don-tol´o-je]
1. scientific study of the teeth.

den·tis·try

(den'tis-trē),
The healing science and art concerned with the structure and function of the orofacial complex, and with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of deformities, pathoses, and traumatic injuries thereof.

odontology

/odon·tol·o·gy/ (o″don-tol´ah-je)
1. scientific study of the teeth.

odontology

(ō′dŏn-tŏl′ə-jē)
n.
The study of the structure, development, and abnormalities of the teeth.

o·don′to·log′i·cal (-tə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.
o·don′to·log′i·cal·ly adv.
o′don·tol′o·gist n.

odontology

[ō′dontol′əjē]
Etymology: Gk, odous + logos, science
the scientific study of the anatomy and physiology of the teeth and of the surrounding structures of the oral cavity.

o·don·tol·o·gy

(ō'don-tol'ŏ-jē)
The study of the teeth and their supporting structures.
[odonto- + G. logos, study]

odontology

The study of the structure, growth, function and diseases of the teeth.

den·tis·try

(den'tis-trē)
The healing science and art concerned with structure and function of the orofacial complex, and with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of deformities, pathoses, and traumatic injuries thereof.
Synonym(s): odontology, odontonosology.

odontology

1. scientific study of the teeth.
2. dentistry.
References in periodicals archive ?
also offered possible solutions to these challenges: schools could consult a local medical examiner or coroner to locate forensic odontologists willing to offer support in the development and delivery of forensic classes; students could participate as volunteers in community disaster drills; forensic courses could be taught using distance educational technology, and interested faculty members could be trained through American Society of Forensic Odontology (ASFO)-accredited courses and travel to school programs to facilitate hands-on learning activities.
In addition to deploying, he provides daily administrative and logistic support to 31 anthropologists and 4 odontologists (dentists), all of whom have advanced degrees and specialized experience.
While the author correctly notes that a Board certified odontologist identified these wounds as a bite mark, he fails to tell the reader that other odontologists found that the wound was not a bite mark.
A new, detailed image (left) of what the victim may have looked like was produced with the help a forensic artist and an odontologist, and was shown on the Crimewatch show.
The American Board of Forensic Odontology (ABFO) recommends the use of dental hygienists on mass fatality victim identification teams while under the direct supervision of the forensic odontologist, since dental hygienists hold licensure in competencies that directly benefit the forensic dental team, including administrative skills, dental radiography and clinical oral examination of both hard and soft tissues.
Michael West, a dentist from Hattiesburg who had testified as an expert forensic odontologist for the prosecution in numerous cases, examined the marks.
A practicing dentist in the Sarasota area for almost 20 years, she also serves as a forensic odontologist.
The identification of old and new dental implants can become a problem for the dentist treating a patient with no dental records available and also for the forensic odontologist while attempting the identification of an unknown cadaver.
4) The first forensic odontologist in the United States was Dr.
Hayne performed the autopsy in both cases, and in both cases Hayne and the disgraced forensic odontologist Michael West identified bite marks on the bodies of the victims that they say implicated the defendants.
Forensic odontologist Douglas Sheasby said the bite on Bernadette Johnstone's thigh matched a cast taken of the accused's mouth.