odontoid process


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process

 [pros´es]
1. a prominence or projection, as from a bone.
2. a series of operations or events leading to achievement of a specific result.
3. to subject to such a series to produce desired changes.
acromial process acromion.
altered family p's former name for the nursing diagnosis interrupted family processes.
alveolar process the part of the bone in either the maxilla or mandible that surrounds and supports the teeth.
basilar process a quadrilateral plate of the occipital bone projecting superiorly and anteriorly from the foramen magnum.
calcaneal process of cuboid bones a process projecting posteriorly from the inferomedial angle of the cuboid bone that supports the anterior calcaneus.
caudate process the right of the two processes on the caudate lobe of the liver.
ciliary p's meridionally arranged ridges or folds projecting from the crown of the ciliary body.
clinoid process any of three processes of the sphenoid bone (anterior, medial, and posterior).
coracoid process a curved process arising from the upper neck of the scapula and overhanging the shoulder joint; called also coracoid.
coronoid process
1. the anterior part of the upper end of the ramus of the mandible.
2. a projection at the proximal end of the ulna.
disturbed thought p's a nursing diagnosis approved by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as the experiencing by an individual of disruption in cognitive operations and activities; it is related to various mental and personality disorders. Contributing factors include physiologic changes, psychologic conflicts, memory loss, impaired judgment, and sleep deprivation. Defining characteristics include inaccurate interpretation of the environment; cognitive dissonance; distractibility; decreased ability to grasp ideas; impaired ability to make decisions, solve problems, or reason; disorientation to time, place, person, circumstances, or events; and inappropriate or nonreality-based thinking.
dysfunctional family p's: alcoholism a nursing diagnosis approved by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as psychosocial, spiritual, and physiological functions of the family unit that are chronically disorganized, leading to conflict, denial of problems, resistance to change, ineffective problem solving, and a series of self-perpetuating crises. See also alcoholism.
ensiform process xiphoid process.
ethmoid process a bony projection above and behind the maxillary process of the inferior nasal concha.
family p's the psychosocial, physiological, and spiritual functions and relationships within the family unit; nursing diagnoses include dysfunctional family processes: alcoholism and interrupted family processes.
frontonasal process frontonasal prominence.
interrupted family p's a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as a change in family relationships and/or functioning.
malar process zygomatic process of the maxilla.
mammillary process a tubercle on each superior articular process of a lumbar vertebra.
mandibular process mandibular prominence.
mastoid process a conical projection at the base of the mastoid portion of the temporal bone.
maxillary process
2. a bony process descending from the ethmoid process of the inferior nasal concha.
nursing process see nursing process.
odontoid process a toothlike projection of the axis that articulates with the atlas.
pterygoid process either of the two processes of the sphenoid bone, descending from the points of junction of the great wings and the body of the bone, and each consisting of a lateral and a medial plate.
spinous process of vertebra a part of a vertebra projecting backward from the arch, giving attachment to muscles of the back.
styloid process a long, pointed projection, particularly a long spine projecting downward from the inferior surface of the temporal bone.
temporal process the posterior blunt process of the zygomatic bone that articulates with the zygomatic process of the temporal bone to form the zygomatic arch.
uncinate process any hooklike process, as of vertebrae, the lacrimal bone, or the pancreas.
xiphoid process the pointed process of cartilage, supported by a core of bone, connected with the lower end of the sternum; called also xiphoid.
The xiphoid process. Redrawn from Applegate, 1995.
zygomatic process a projection in three parts, from the frontal bone, temporal bone, and maxilla, by which they articulate with the zygomatic bone (see Appendix 3-3).
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

dens

, pl.

den·tes

(denz, den'tēz), [TA]
1. Synonym(s): tooth
2. A strong toothlike process projecting upward from the body of the axis (second cervical vertebra), or epistropheus, around which the atlas rotates. Synonym(s): dens axis [TA], odontoid process of epistropheus, odontoid process
[L.]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

odontoid process

n.
A small, toothlike, upward projection from the second vertebra of the neck around which the first vertebra rotates.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
Enlarge picture
ODONTOID PROCESS: articulation of atlas and axis

odontoid process

A toothlike process extending upward from the axis and about which the atlas rotates. Synonym: dens See: illustration
See also: process
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

odontoid process

A strong tooth-like process projecting upwards from the front arch of the second vertebra of the neck (the axis bone) around which the first vertebra rotates to allow the head to turn to either side.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

odontoid process

a projection of the second vertebra (the axis), allowing the ATLAS to rotate and thus move the head round.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

dens

, pl. dentes (denz, den'tēz)
1. [TA]
Synonym(s): tooth.
2. A strong toothlike process projecting upward from body of axis (second cervical vertebra), or epistropheus, around which the atlas rotates.
Synonym(s): odontoid process of epistropheus, odontoid process.
[L.]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Coscia, "Fractures of the odontoid process. Treatment with anterior screw fixation," Spine, vol.
Odontoid process erosion was considered in case of changes in the typical outline of the odontoid process.
When this line is continued superiorly it merges with the anterior aspect of the odontoid process. The posterior vertebral line joins the posterior margins of the vertebral bodies and when continued superiorly merges with the posterior aspect of the odontoid process.
Diagnostic pitfalls in osteomyelitis of the odontoid process: Case report.
The effects of excessive lateral bending include dislocation and fractures of processes, including the odontoid process. In addition, lateral wedging of vertebral bodies may occur.
Liu, "Solitary bone cyst of the odontoid process and body of the axis: a case report," Orthopaedic Surgery, vol.
We describe a patient presenting with spontaneous cervical osteomyelitis affecting the odontoid process with thrombosis of the adjacent internal jugular vein extending intracranially into cerebral sinuses.
C2 vertebrae are different from other by the presence of Dens (Odontoid process), which projects cranially from the superior surface of the body.
Os odontoideum is the most common anomaly of the odontoid process. (1) The term os odontoideum was first coined by Giacomini in 1886 and is defined as "...
The odontoid process of the axis articulates with the atlas-transverse ligaments.
three parts of the cervical vertebrae were traced; these entities include the dens odontoid process - C2, body of the third cervical vertebrae - C3 and the body of the fourth cervical vertebrae - C4.
However, 2 possible reasons have been speculated: first, being the element of mesodermal dysplasia itself, and second, being the presence of neurofibromatous tissue anterior to the odontoid process.8 In the present case, no neurofibroma was found anterior to C2, and since it is a widely accepted fact that in neurofibromatosis there is genetically related maldevelopment of neuroectoderm and mesoderm, there may be associated deformities in the adjacent structures and ligaments--in turn leading to AAD.