odoriferous

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o·dor·if·er·ous

(ō'dōr-if'ĕr-ŭs),
Having a scent, perfume, or odor.
Synonym(s): odorous
[odor + L. fero, to bear]

odoriferous

(ō″dor-ĭf′ĕ-rŭs) [L. odor, smell, + ferre, to bear]
Bearing an odor; fragrant; perfumed.
References in periodicals archive ?
But an odiferous offense isn't the only NEP unit that has failed to live up to expectations early in the season.
freight train and asked Clem for work, was washing Clem's new phaeton before he began mucking out the stalls and dumping the results on the odiferous manure pile in the alley.
Essential oils (EOs) are products of the secondary metabolism of plants, defined as the volatile lipid soluble portion of plant fluids containing odiferous compounds of vegetable plant matter [1].
This sequence was also used in the entrance lobby to add a high percentage of outside air there upon a particularly odiferous situation.
Alliumd are among the most odiferous ingredients in the kitchen.
Garlic This odiferous root plant has been shown to have a bevy of health benefits when eaten fresh, (rather than aged or in supplement form).
Due to the upward shift of pH, these amines create an exfoliation of vaginal squamous epithelial cells that becomes part of the odiferous discharge, one of the four symptoms observed in BV (see below).
He climbed onto the van's bench seat between the odiferous, blood-flushed, ill-tempered, funhouse-mirrored Poles.
It was like a skunk at a garden party, and to a large segment of the tax-exempt sector, the testimony at this summer's congressional hearing had to have been odiferous. [paragraph] The testimony was that of University of Illinois law professor John D.
(10) Similarly, there are fewer words to describe smell experience than there are for all other sensory experiences; in English, Herz identifies these as "stench, stink, redolent, aromatic, pungent, fragrant, smelly, odiferous, and scented" (58).
The addition of LAB inoculants to food residue also preserves the residue by inhibiting the growth of putrefactive bacteria that degrade the residue to odiferous compounds, suppresses the growth of food poisoning bacteria (Wang et al., 2001) and the LAB improve the nutritional characteristics of the food residue (Yang et al., 2006).
"But in the engravings," he wrote woefully, "there was no desolation; no dirt; no rags; no flies; no ugly features; no sore eyes no stench of camel." Given his druthers, the celebrated American writer much preferred the imagined Holy Land to its real-life, fly-specked, odiferous counterpart.