oculomotor nerve


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Related to oculomotor nerve: abducens nerve

oculomotor

 [ok″u-lo-mo´tor]
pertaining to or affecting eye movements.
oculomotor nerve the third cranial nerve; it is mixed, that is, it contains both sensory and motor fibers. Various branches of the oculomotor nerve provide for muscle sense and movement in most of the muscles of the eye, for constriction of the pupil, and for accommodation of the eye. See anatomic Table of Nerves in the Appendices.

oculomotor nerve

n.
Either of the third pair of cranial nerves, which originate in the midbrain and control most of the muscles that move the eyeballs.

oculomotor nerve

The third of the paired cranial nerves arising directly from the brainstem. This nerve supplies four of the six small muscles that move the eye, the muscle that elevates the upper lid and the circular muscles of the iris. Paralysis of an oculomotor nerve causes the pupil to be enlarged, the lid to droop and the eye to be unable to turn inwards.

oculomotor nerve

the third cranial nerve of vertebrates, that innervates the muscles which move the eyeball.

nucleus

1. A mass of grey matter composed of nerve cell bodies in any part of the brain or spinal cord and dealing with a common function. 2. Core or central portion of the cell body of a neuron, containing cellular DNA in particular. Plural: nuclei.
abducens nucleus Nucleus of the abducens nerve (sixth cranial nerve) located in the lower part of the pons and whose axons supply the lateral rectus muscle.
accessory oculomotor nucleus See Edinger-Westphal nucleus.
nucleus of the crystalline lens See crystalline lens.
Edinger-Westphal nucleus Part of the oculomotor nucleus, it is situated posterior to the main nucleus and contains the parasympathetic component of the complex. Axons from the Edinger-Westphal pass out along the third (or oculomotor) nerve to synapse in the ciliary ganglion. Postganglionic fibres pass through the short ciliary nerves to the sphincter pupillae and ciliary muscles. The nucleus also receives fibres concerned with accommodation and fibres from the pretectal nucleus dealing with pupil light reflexes. Syn. accessory oculomotor nucleus; accessory parasympathetic nucleus. See pretectal nucleus; pupil light reflex.
lateral nucleus Part of the oculomotor nucleus which supplies, via the oculomotor nerve, all the extraocular muscles except the superior oblique and the lateral rectus muscles.
lateral geniculate nucleus See lateral geniculate body.
oculomotor nucleus This is the nucleus of the oculomotor nerve (third cranial nerve). It is a complex mass of cells located in the midbrain at the level of the superior colliculus and beneath the cerebral aqueduct (of Sylvius) which connects the third and fourth ventricles. It is divided into several subnuclei. See oculomotor nerve; Edinger-Westphal nucleus; Perlia's nucleus; trochlear nucleus.
olivary nucleus See pretectum; pupil light reflex.
Perlia's nucleus Midline part of the oculomotor nucleus. It is rudimentary in man and primates and may provide part of the innervation of the superior rectus muscle.
pretectal nucleus A complex group of nerve cells in the midbrain anterior to the superior colliculi. One of these, the pretectal olivary nucleus, receives retinal inputs via the optic tract and superior brachium and sends axons to both Edinger-Westphal nuclei. It constitutes a centre of the pupil light reflex. Another, the nucleus of the optic tract, may be involved in the control of reflex eye movements. Other fibres from the pretectal nucleus innervate the cornea, the iris, the ciliary muscle and the extraocular muscles (except the lateral rectus and superior oblique muscles), as well as the levator palpebrae muscle.
trochlear nucleus A nucleus of the trochlear nerve (fourth cranial nerve) located at the level of the inferior colliculus and below the posterior end of the oculomotor nerve nucleus, it sends fibres to the contralateral superior oblique muscle.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this article, we describe a rare manifestation of a sphenoid sinus mucocele as isolated oculomotor nerve palsy in a diabetic patient.
Although there are many reports of such tumours in the literature, initial presentation with oculomotor nerve palsy is uncommon (2-4) and does not appear to have been reported in a parturient.
The oculomotor nerve from the brain to the pupil was left intact.
(8,9) The most frequently involved cranial nerve is the oculomotor nerve, followed by abducens nerve.
Dissecting the P2 segment was necessary laterally over the oculomotor nerve to the tentorial edge (Figure 6).
(5) Complications include damage to many important surrounding structures which includes internal carotid artery, optic nerve, ophthalmic artery, oculomotor nerve, pituitary gland, brain lobe etc.
A previous case of oculomotor nerve palsy associated with trigeminal-autonomic features secondary to sphenoid sinus mucocele was reported, but without headache [5].
Ptosis may be caused by trauma to the levator muscle, insult to the superior cervical sympathetic ganglion or damage to the oculomotor nerve. Such damage could be a sign or symptom of an underlying condition such as diabetes mellitus, a brain tumour, a Pancoast tumour affecting the apex of the lung, or diseases which cause weakness in muscles or nerve damage, such as myasthenia gravis or oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy.
The latter is located at the dorsomedial region of the oculomotor nerve nucleus which controls ciliary muscle and sphincter of the pupil.
These include optic nerve, oculomotor nerve, trochlear nerve, abducens nerve, and the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve.
Although the CSF-to-serum ratio of IgG by Eliza was only 0.0880, patient was treated for oculomotor nerve palsy secondary to Lyme meningitis.