oculist


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Related to oculist: ophthalmological

ophthalmologist

 [of″thal-mol´ŏ-jist]
a physician who specializes in diagnosing and prescribing treatment for defects, injuries, and diseases of the eye, and is skilled at delicate eye surgery, such as that required to remove cataracts; called also oculist.

oph·thal·mol·o·gist

(of'thal-mol'ŏ-jist), Do not confuse this word with optician or optometrist.
A specialist in ophthalmology.
Synonym(s): oculist

oculist

(ŏk′yə-lĭst)
n.
1. A physician who treats diseases of the eyes; an ophthalmologist.
2. An optometrist.

oph·thal·mol·o·gist

(of'thăl-mol'ŏ-jist)
A medical specialist in ophthalmology who treats diseases of the eye medically and surgically.
Synonym(s): oculist.

oculist

2. An ophthalmic OPTICIAN (optometrist).

ophthalmologist 

A medical specialist who practises ophthalmology. Syn. oculist (this term is rarely used nowadays); ophthalmic surgeon.
References in periodicals archive ?
If there was a specially trained oculist in Dublin they would custom make the prosthetic eyes for the children.
(Betsey meets a doctor at an oculist's shop near the Fair who happens to summer near Byfleet; he agrees to attend to Peggy that August.) The story ends with Betsey's return and her promise to tell her friends all about the Centennial--there is "enough," she says, "to think of and tell ye for the rest o' my days." The great experience has transformed her, at least temporarily (she looks "quite young and gay, and wears a townish and unfamiliar air"), and will bring, through her material, medical, and narrative gifts, new pleasures to the little poorhouse world (807).
In a report by the Associated Press (April 10, 1923), an oculist treating Sisler was quoted as saying that "the star's vision was normal in each eye." The report said further that the oculist emphasized the word each, indicating that visual acuity was normal but leaving open the possibility that coordination of the eye movements was impaired.
for the privilege of vision I am indebted to an oculist, who in my tenth year operated upon me in Philadelphia.
that in my idiolect "oculist" means eye doctor is not refuted by
Inoculation, the later term for the process, is derived from the Latin oculus which meant both an eye (as in oculist or binoculars) and a bud on a tree.
There is also a diffusion of the gaze, from the anticipated (and refused) gaze of Razumov's father-confessor, to the gaze of Mikulin, who, notably, meets with Razumov in an oculist's office (prior to his mission in Geneva).
Laurie Lamon depicts "Poetry" that brings the objects of familial memory into articulation, while her poem "A Wonder" gives a poignant twist to a mother-daughter encounter at the oculist. Rebecca B.
Payne visited the office where Moreno-Hagerty was working, apparently as an oculist, but he refused to talk to him.
THE FIRST ROMAN EVER TO LAY EYES ON IRELAND MAY have been an eye doctor, if we take at face value one of the earliest pieces of archaeological evidence discovered on Irish soil, an inscribed oculist's stamp stating that its owner was named Marcus Juventus Tutianus.
Was there any difference between the stately faculty physicians truly at the foot and the infamous contemporary quacks above -- Joshua (`Spot') Ward, Sally Mapp the bone-manipulator, and John (`Chevalier') Taylor, the oculist? No: because the motto said et plurima mortis imago: everywhere the face of death.
For example, if experience e is of a speaker assertively uttering `Jones is an ophthalmologist', and experience e * is of a speaker assertively uttering `Jones is an oculist', then although e and e * represent the speaker as saying the very same thing, they nonetheless differ in content: e and e * represent differently concerning the vehicle of representation.