ocular hypertension


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Related to ocular hypertension: glaucoma, ocular migraine

ocular hypertension

Increased intraocular pressure, typically exceeding 21 mm Hg. This condition, present in glaucoma, may predispose affected persons to optic nerve damage and visual field loss.
See also: hypertension

hypertension, ocular

A condition in which the intraocular pressure (IOP) is above normal (>21 mmHg) but in which there are neither visual field defects nor optic disc changes. Open-angle glaucoma may or may not develop later: risk factors include thin central corneal thickness, large cup/disc ratio, high IOP and lack of treatment to reduce IOP greater than 30 mmHg.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Ocular Hypertension Study found that to achieve target IOP, nearly 40% of patients had to be on at least two IOP-lowering medications [27].
In summary, reduced OFF-responses were recorded in monkeys under long-term ocular hypertension when dysfunction of photoreceptor was involved.
Figure 1: Bar chart showing clinical presentation of patients with primary open-angle glaucoma, ocular hypertension Clinical presentation Group I (LTFC) Group II (LTFuC) Total Painless 14 16 30 diminution of vision Coloured 2 1 3 haloes around eyes Frequent 1 0 1 change in presbyopic glasses Pain in the 2 1 3 eyes Itching 1 2 3 Eye strain 3 5 8 Watering 3 2 5 Scotomas 2 2 4 Headache 2 3 5 Note: Table made from bar graph.
A randomized, double masked, multicenter clinical trial comparing bimatoprost and timolol for the treatment of glaucoma and ocular hypertension. Br J Ophthalmol 2003;87(1):57-62.
Retinal ganglion cells function measured by the PERG test in patients with ocular hypertension. Klin Oczna.
* The report provides a snapshot of the global therapeutic landscape of Ocular Hypertension
Often, the term ocular hypertension is used to distinguish people with elevated eye pressure from those with glaucoma, which damages the optic nerve and is a leading cause of vision loss.
The aim of this study was to check whether steroids can be used to induce experimental glaucoma / ocular hypertension in an animal model.
The ophthalmic diagnoses were anterior uveitis, ocular hypertension, and suspect pectenitis OS, along with retinitis OD.
Shrivastava A et al referred to articles in literature which demonstrated a modest, long-lasting decrease in IOP following phacoemulsification and posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation in patients with primary open- angle glaucoma and ocular hypertension. The mechanism of this average pressure-lowering effect has yet to be elucidated.
TIMOPTIC in OCUDOSE, along with TIMOPTIC and TIMOPTIC XE, is indicated for the treatment of elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) in patients with ocular hypertension or open-angle glaucoma.
Prior to testing, subjects had complete eye exams, ocular hypertension and no signs of glaucoma.