occupational injustice

occupational injustice

Any undue limitation on a person's freedom to have or to pursue meaningful occupational engagement in society.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Occupational deprivation is a form of occupational injustice in which external circumstances, such as social, environmental, political, and geographical factors, preclude engagement in occupations (Durocher, Gibson, & Rappolt, 2013).
The most frequently reported OT role in CP management (n = 40/52; 76.9%) was to improve activities and participation and was distributed in the following way: enabling occupational engagement (n = 20; 38.5%) and occupational performance (n = 15; 28.8%), providing vocational rehabilitation (n = 11; 21.2%), promoting participation (n=5; 9.6%), promoting functional independence, mobility, and autonomy (n = 5; 9.6%), addressing occupational balance (n = 4; 7.7%), restoring occupational identity (n = 2; 3.8%), and limiting occupational injustice (n = 1; 1.9%).
For example, restriction in the ability to engage in occupations that are meaningful for a person or community is a matter of occupational injustice (Wilcock & Townsend, 2014).
Using occupation-based, as well as non-occupation-based models, the author looks at the consequences that result from the occupational injustice that individuals experience following their displacement, and the various forms of adaptive behaviors they develop in order to restore their identity.
Another occupational injustice described in the literature is occupational alienation.
In addition, concerns have been expressed about the resulting inability to address the occupational needs of service-users, suggesting this might lead to occupational injustice, deprivation, imbalance and alienation (Pettican & Bryant, 2007).
Nevertheless, to be unable to have a daily occupational repertoire that is similar to others with whom an individual associates, is an example of occupational injustice (Wilcock, 2006) and such a situation constitutes a considerable risk for developing ill-health.
The profession has got the tools and the resources in the form of visionary individuals to speak to issues of occupational injustice as they arise and who will continue to 'fill the gaps'.
Fundamental issues such as functional impairment, human rights, occupational injustice, and restrictions in participation are addressed.
In hindsight, ten years ago, when I commenced practising in the compulsory schooling sector, I should have articulated my practice simply as: righting occupational injustice.
The link between inequality, poverty and occupational injustice, affects not just third world countries but certain populations within strong economies e.g.
In other words, do not suffer an occupational injustice. Do you believe that the same ideological beliefs would underpin a movement from GPs to play a larger role in return to work?
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