occupational illness


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Related to occupational illness: Occupational diseases

occupational illness

Any acute or chronic disorder associated with or caused by an individual's occupation.
See: table; chronic lead poisoning
ConditionExposed Workers
AnemiaLead (battery reclaimers, shipyard workers)
AsbestosisShipyard workers and others exposed to asbestos fibers
AsthmaMeat wrappers, woodworkers, those exposed to platinum, nickel, solder, ammonia, cotton dust, formaldehyde, pesticides
ByssinosisCotton textile workers
CancerPeople who work with radioactive materials (health care, lab workers), x-ray workers (industrial and health care), miners
Carpal tunnel syndromeTypists, computer programmers, and other people who work with their hands
Contact dermatitisHealth care workers using latex gloves, and florists
Decompression sicknessDivers, marine salvage workers
Hearing impairmentPeople who work in noisy environments without adequate ear protection
LeptospirosisVeterinarians
PneumoconiosisCoal miners
PneumonitisWood workers (esp. red cedar), mushroom growers, cheese handlers, and farmers
SilicosisMiners, foundry workers
Skin granulomasBeryllium workers (e.g., in auto or aircraft industries)
Tennis or golfer's elbowCarpenters, plumbers, and athletes
Vibration syndrome, including Raynaud's phenomenonTruck drivers, hand-vibrating drill operators, jackhammer workers
SOURCE: Starkey, C, Brown, S, and Ryan, J: Examination of Orthopedic and Athletic Injuries, ed 3, FA Davis, Philadelphia, 2010. *As determined by the rectal temperature ** Within normal limits for an exercising athlete
Evaluation FindingHeat CrampsHeat SyncopeHeat ExhaustionHeat Stroke
Hydration StatusDehydratedDehydratedDehydratedDehydrated
Core Temperature*Within normal limits**Within normal limits102° – 104°F (38.9° – 40°C)Greater than 104°F (40°C)
Skin Color and TemperatureWithin normal limitsWithin normal limitsCool/clammyHot
PaleRed
PulseWithin normal limitsDecreasedRapid and weakIncreased
Blood PressureWithin normal limitsA sudden, imperceptible drop in blood pressure, which rapidly returns to normalLowHigh
RespirationWithin normal limitsWithin normal limitsHyperventilationRapid hyperventilation
Mental StateWithin normal limitsFatigueDizzinessDizziness
Possible fatigueDizzinessFatigueDrowsiness
FaintingSlight confusionConfusion/ disorientation
Emotional instability
Violent Behavoir
Neuromuscular ChangesCramping in one or more musclesMuscle crampsWeakness
WeaknessDecerebrate posture
Gastrointestinal and Urinary ChangesIntestinal CrampingNausea
NauseaVomiting
VomitingDiarrhea
Diarrhea
Decreased Urinary output
Central Nervous SystemSyncopeHeadache
HeadacheUnconsciousness
Seizures
Coma
Other FindingsThirst“Tunnel vision” may be reportedThirstDilated pupils
Loss of appetite (anorexia)
Chills
See also: illness
References in periodicals archive ?
Disease latency periods and the difficulty of ascertaining whether a worker contracted a disease at work or elsewhere make it difficult for either program to accurately track occupational illnesses.
About 23% of construction companies do not carry out workplace risk assessment, thus increasing a possibility for an accident or an occupational illness to occur.
Evaluating physicians should be knowledgeable regarding the potential for occupational illness caused by pesticide exposure, signs and symptoms, and methods of treatment.
Meanwhile, the majority of businesses are failing to deal with employee health issues as they arise, with only one in three companies offering training when it comes to dealing with occupational illness or managing absence.
In a letter to the comptroller general, the committee members requested that the GAO "study the efficacy, fairness, and solvency of various trust funds and programs established to compensate individuals for harm caused by mass torts and other exposure to dangerous materials and products." Specifically, the letter suggested a review of similar programs created by Congress to compensate victims, such as the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act and the Radiation Compensation Act, as well as trust funds facilitated by legislative acts or bankruptcy court orders, such as the Johns-Manville Personal Injury Settlement Trust.
* Established new benefits under the Energy Employee Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act to compensate energy employees for illnesses resulting from exposure to toxic substances at a Department of Energy facility; the provision would direct the Department of Labor to administer this new benefit program, which is intended to provide a simple, fair, and uniform workers compensation system
This work, which is funded by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), supports energy workers' claims under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act.
While non-fatal injury and occupational illness rates have been falling in workplaces across Canada and the United States, rates in health care and the social services have been soaring (Boyd, 1995; National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, 2000).
There were 333,800 occupational illness cases reported in 2001, with more than half in the manufacturing sector.
Class A--Property damage is $1,000,000 or more; an injury or occupational illness results in a fatality or permanent total disability.
HHS recently issued two final rules under which the department will provide scientific expertise to assist decisionmaking under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000.
The Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000 establishes a program to provide compensation to employees of the Department of Energy, its contractors and subcontractors, and companies that provided beryllium to the Department of Energy and nuclear weapons employers.

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