occupational dose

occupational dose

Radiation safety A dose of ionizing radiation received by a person at work, where assigned duties involve exposure to ionizing radiation and radioactive materials
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While occupational dose limits vary somewhat across jurisdictions, greater variation has been noted in monitoring requirements.
The recommendations in the United States for occupational dose limits are set at 50 mSv in any one year, with a lifetime limit of 10 mSv multiplied by the individual's age in years.
Department of Energy identified four violations of radiation protection and nuclear safety regulations in occupational dose limits, written procedures and work processes, training and qualification, and quality assurance.
11) That agency also has established an occupational dose limit of 5 rem per year.
The occupational dose limit for extremity exposure should be less than 500 mSv or 50 rem per year.
In the US Army, all personnel who are occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation and may exceed 10% of the occupational dose limit of 5 rems (50 mSv) per year are issued dosimetry.
In addition, most measures that lead to patient dose reduction also yield a reduction in occupational dose, therefore radiation workers themselves stand to benefit.
Extrapolating to estimate yearly doses, no anaesthetist would have approached the annual occupational dose limits for ionizing radiation.
31) Under- or over-reporting of occupational dose histories may lead to inaccurate subject stratification or risk estimates.
The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has set guidelines for the maximum safe occupational dose of mercury at 300 to 500 micrograms per day.
Well, the maximum occupational dose that is allowed by federal regulatory bodies like the Nuclear Regulatory Commission is 5 rads per year.
Given recommendations from the National Council of Radiation Protection (NCRP), in 1956, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) adopted the proposed dose limits, expressed as the following simple equation for occupational exposure and assuming that people under 18 are not occupationally exposed: The limits for occupational dose accumulated at various ages is the dose D = 5 (N - 18), where N is the age in years, and D is expressed in rems (2).

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