occupational dose

occupational dose

Radiation safety A dose of ionizing radiation received by a person at work, where assigned duties involve exposure to ionizing radiation and radioactive materials
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Holtec and its affiliates specialising in demolition and decommissioning will deploy operating processes and methods that enable them to expedite site clean-up and minimize occupational dose to workers.
Dr Baipoledi said the ultimate goal of establishing NDR was to minimise the possibility of radiation workers receive at the workplace and also ensure that occupational dose records were maintained and remain retrievable in the long term.
Therefore, the robotic and remote flaw detection equipment is widely used to reduce the work duration and occupational dose. The optimized work durations at these four positions are 15, 15, 30, and 10 man-hours.
While occupational dose limits vary somewhat across jurisdictions, greater variation has been noted in monitoring requirements.
The recommendations in the United States for occupational dose limits are set at 50 mSv in any one year, with a lifetime limit of 10 mSv multiplied by the individual's age in years.
Department of Energy identified four violations of radiation protection and nuclear safety regulations in occupational dose limits, written procedures and work processes, training and qualification, and quality assurance.
(11) That agency also has established an occupational dose limit of 5 rem per year.
The occupational dose limit for extremity exposure should be less than 500 mSv or 50 rem per year.
In the US Army, all personnel who are occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation and may exceed 10% of the occupational dose limit of 5 rems (50 mSv) per year are issued dosimetry.
In addition, most measures that lead to patient dose reduction also yield a reduction in occupational dose, therefore radiation workers themselves stand to benefit.
Extrapolating to estimate yearly doses, no anaesthetist would have approached the annual occupational dose limits for ionizing radiation.
(31) Under- or over-reporting of occupational dose histories may lead to inaccurate subject stratification or risk estimates.

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