occupational dose

occupational dose

Radiation safety A dose of ionizing radiation received by a person at work, where assigned duties involve exposure to ionizing radiation and radioactive materials
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
While occupational dose limits vary somewhat across jurisdictions, greater variation has been noted in monitoring requirements.
The recommendations in the United States for occupational dose limits are set at 50 mSv in any one year, with a lifetime limit of 10 mSv multiplied by the individual's age in years.
1, 2011, that an employee had received radiation exposure above the annual occupational dose due to a radiation source being unlocked and unshielded.
In the US Army, all personnel who are occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation and may exceed 10% of the occupational dose limit of 5 rems (50 mSv) per year are issued dosimetry.
In addition, most measures that lead to patient dose reduction also yield a reduction in occupational dose, therefore radiation workers themselves stand to benefit.
This is also significantly under the maximum annual occupational dose of 20 mSv.
Extrapolating to estimate yearly doses, no anaesthetist would have approached the annual occupational dose limits for ionizing radiation.
The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has set guidelines for the maximum safe occupational dose of mercury at 300 to 500 micrograms per day.
Given recommendations from the National Council of Radiation Protection (NCRP), in 1956, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) adopted the proposed dose limits, expressed as the following simple equation for occupational exposure and assuming that people under 18 are not occupationally exposed: The limits for occupational dose accumulated at various ages is the dose D = 5 (N - 18), where N is the age in years, and D is expressed in rems (2).
By implementing RAIS, this mission will assist Bahrain in improving its national register of sources and in establishing a national register of occupational doses, and consequently meeting the requirements of the international safety standards.
Radiation workers typically receive occupational doses that are substantially less than their natural background doses [in the United States, occupational doses are about 30% of average natural background doses (U.
Occupational doses of radiation from fluoroscopy-guided intervention procedures are the highest ones registered among medical staff using x-rays.

Full browser ?