occult

(redirected from occults)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

occult

 [ŏ-kult´]
obscure or hidden from view.
occult blood test examination by microscope or chemical test of a specimen (such as feces, urine, or gastric juice) for presence of blood that is not otherwise detectable. Feces are tested when intestinal bleeding is suspected but there is no visible evidence of blood.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

oc·cult

(ŏ-kŭlt', ok'ŭlt),
1. Hidden; concealed; not manifest.
2. Denoting a concealed hemorrhage, the blood being inapparent or localized to a site where it is not visible.
3. In oncology, a clinically unidentified primary tumor with recognized metastases.
[L. oc-culo, pp. -cultus, to cover, hide]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

occult

(ə-kŭlt′, ŏk′ŭlt′)
adj.
a. Medicine Detectable only by microscopic examination or chemical analysis, as a minute blood sample.
b. Not accompanied by readily detectable signs or symptoms: occult carcinoma.
v.intr.
To become concealed or extinguished at regular intervals: a lighthouse beacon that occults every 45 seconds.

oc·cult′ly adv.
oc·cult′ness n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

occult

Medspeak
adjective Not obvious; hidden; of unknown cause.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

occult

adjective Not obvious, hidden, of unknown cause noun Paranormal dee-dee-dee–dee–dee-dee-dee–dee
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

oc·cult

(ŏ-kŭlt')
1. Hidden; concealed; not manifest.
2. Denoting a disease or condition (bleeding, infection) that is clinically inapparent, though it may be inferred from indirect evidence or identified by special tests.
See: occult blood
3. oncology A clinically unidentified primary tumor with recognized metastases.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

occult

Concealed or hidden, especially of traces of blood in the faeces or sputum which can be detected only by special tests.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Occult

Not visible or easily detected.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

oc·cult

(ŏ-kŭlt')
Hidden; concealed; not manifest.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
DECEMBER 12 The nearly full Moon occults Aldebaran tonight for much of North America.
* On the morning of March 5th, an 8.7-magnitude star northeast of Antares will be occulted by faint 72 Feronia for up to 4 seconds along a path from southern California across northern Arizona.
* On the morning of March 7th, an 8.4-magnitude star in the vicinity of M83 in Hydra, far south of Spica, will be occulted by faint 506 Marion for up to 10 seconds as seen from southern California, likely including Greater Los Angeles.
* Late on the night of October 21-22, along a path from Southern California through Wyoming and Winnipeg, 11.9-magnitude 521 Brixia occults a 10.5-magnitude star by Orion's club within a few minutes of 7:14 October 22nd UT.
* Just after dark on the evening of October 31st, along a path from Florida through Michigan, faint 35 Leukothea, also slow moving, occults a 10.6-magnitude star in Aquarius for up to 39 seconds within a few minutes of 0:18 November 1st UT.
* The Moon occults Mars on September 19th--but again only for central and southern South America, and partly in daytime (in evening twilight for some of the Atlantic coast).
* The naked-eye star [Alpha.sup.2] Librae, magnitude 2.7, will be occulted for up to 2.6 seconds by the faint asteroid 363 Padua on September 16th along a path from Washington state to Florida--in the daytime!
Marianna occults an 8th-magnitude star, SAO 210276, in Corona Australis for up to 5 seconds.