occult

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Related to occultism: Satanism

occult

 [ŏ-kult´]
obscure or hidden from view.
occult blood test examination by microscope or chemical test of a specimen (such as feces, urine, or gastric juice) for presence of blood that is not otherwise detectable. Feces are tested when intestinal bleeding is suspected but there is no visible evidence of blood.

oc·cult

(ŏ-kŭlt', ok'ŭlt),
1. Hidden; concealed; not manifest.
2. Denoting a concealed hemorrhage, the blood being inapparent or localized to a site where it is not visible.
3. In oncology, a clinically unidentified primary tumor with recognized metastases.
[L. oc-culo, pp. -cultus, to cover, hide]

occult

/oc·cult/ (ŏ-kult´) obscure or hidden from view.

occult

(ə-kŭlt′, ŏk′ŭlt′)
adj.
a. Medicine Detectable only by microscopic examination or chemical analysis, as a minute blood sample.
b. Not accompanied by readily detectable signs or symptoms: occult carcinoma.
v.intr.
To become concealed or extinguished at regular intervals: a lighthouse beacon that occults every 45 seconds.

oc·cult′ly adv.
oc·cult′ness n.

occult

[əkult′]
Etymology: L, occultare, to hide
hidden or difficult to observe directly, such as occult prolapse of the umbilical cord or occult blood.

occult

Medspeak
adjective Not obvious; hidden; of unknown cause.

occult

adjective Not obvious, hidden, of unknown cause noun Paranormal dee-dee-dee–dee–dee-dee-dee–dee

oc·cult

(ŏ-kŭlt')
1. Hidden; concealed; not manifest.
2. Denoting a disease or condition (bleeding, infection) that is clinically inapparent, though it may be inferred from indirect evidence or identified by special tests.
See: occult blood
3. oncology A clinically unidentified primary tumor with recognized metastases.

occult

Concealed or hidden, especially of traces of blood in the faeces or sputum which can be detected only by special tests.

Occult

Not visible or easily detected.

oc·cult

(ŏ-kŭlt')
Hidden; concealed; not manifest.

occult

obscure or hidden from view.

occult blood test
examination, microscopically or by a chemical test, of a specimen of feces, urine, gastric juice, etc., to determine the presence of blood not otherwise detectable. Feces are tested when intestinal bleeding is suspected but there is no visible evidence of blood in the stools.
occult heartworm infection
infection by Dirofilaria immitis in which circulating microfilariae cannot be detected in the peripheral blood by the usual test methods.
occult spavin
see occult spavin.
occult virus
the virus or infectious agent cannot be isolated but there is strong circumstantial evidence that it is present, e.g. scrapie prion.
References in periodicals archive ?
When Matthew Palmer inherits an old house in Clerkenwell that once belonged to the eponymous Elizabethan mathematician and astrologer who secretly engaged in alchemy and occultism, he immediately gets drawn into its eerie history.
As an alternative science that fundamentally alters the associations between blood and kinship, occultism makes possible the redemption of sibling affinity and with it the meaning of "one blood.
Regardie was Crowley's one-time secretary and biographer, so provides an authenticity and serious tone to over a thousand pages of writings perfect for beginners as well as advanced Crowley students and any student of Golden Dawn or Occultism.
Ackroyd however, even though his pursuit of interests is connected with the history of occultism, should by no means be considered a contemporary alchemist like the other two.
Whereas Victorian Britain had an obsession with seeing psychic phenomenon, there has always existed within occultism a true path, he suggests.
April 1996: Falwell hosts a "Washington for Jesus" rally in the nation's capital where he holds a mock trial of America for engaging in seven deadly sins: persecution of the church, homosexuality, abortion, racism, occultism, addictions and HIV/AIDS (acronym: PHAROAH).
There are many repeated reports of the eccentricity of Rudolf II (1552-1612), whether in connection with politics or occultism.
The attention accorded dreams in modern-day psychology has its origins in those of occultism itself (Greer 137).
This achievement, however, is dwarfed by his editing of the first three editions of the Encyclopedia of Occultism and Parapsychology.
Some administrators attributed acts of misbehavior to occultism and attempted to regulate student behavior in this regard.
However, as advances in the fields of pathology and dynamic psychology were made in the 1920s and 1930s, this interest waned, loosening the ties that had bound photography, occultism, and the paranormal at the turn of the century.