occult

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Related to occultism: Satanism

occult

 [ŏ-kult´]
obscure or hidden from view.
occult blood test examination by microscope or chemical test of a specimen (such as feces, urine, or gastric juice) for presence of blood that is not otherwise detectable. Feces are tested when intestinal bleeding is suspected but there is no visible evidence of blood.

oc·cult

(ŏ-kŭlt', ok'ŭlt),
1. Hidden; concealed; not manifest.
2. Denoting a concealed hemorrhage, the blood being inapparent or localized to a site where it is not visible.
3. In oncology, a clinically unidentified primary tumor with recognized metastases.
[L. oc-culo, pp. -cultus, to cover, hide]

occult

/oc·cult/ (ŏ-kult´) obscure or hidden from view.

occult

(ə-kŭlt′, ŏk′ŭlt′)
adj.
a. Medicine Detectable only by microscopic examination or chemical analysis, as a minute blood sample.
b. Not accompanied by readily detectable signs or symptoms: occult carcinoma.
v.intr.
To become concealed or extinguished at regular intervals: a lighthouse beacon that occults every 45 seconds.

oc·cult′ly adv.
oc·cult′ness n.

occult

[əkult′]
Etymology: L, occultare, to hide
hidden or difficult to observe directly, such as occult prolapse of the umbilical cord or occult blood.

occult

Medspeak
adjective Not obvious; hidden; of unknown cause.

occult

adjective Not obvious, hidden, of unknown cause noun Paranormal dee-dee-dee–dee–dee-dee-dee–dee

oc·cult

(ŏ-kŭlt')
1. Hidden; concealed; not manifest.
2. Denoting a disease or condition (bleeding, infection) that is clinically inapparent, though it may be inferred from indirect evidence or identified by special tests.
See: occult blood
3. oncology A clinically unidentified primary tumor with recognized metastases.

occult

Concealed or hidden, especially of traces of blood in the faeces or sputum which can be detected only by special tests.

Occult

Not visible or easily detected.

oc·cult

(ŏ-kŭlt')
Hidden; concealed; not manifest.

occult

obscure or hidden from view.

occult blood test
examination, microscopically or by a chemical test, of a specimen of feces, urine, gastric juice, etc., to determine the presence of blood not otherwise detectable. Feces are tested when intestinal bleeding is suspected but there is no visible evidence of blood in the stools.
occult heartworm infection
infection by Dirofilaria immitis in which circulating microfilariae cannot be detected in the peripheral blood by the usual test methods.
occult spavin
see occult spavin.
occult virus
the virus or infectious agent cannot be isolated but there is strong circumstantial evidence that it is present, e.g. scrapie prion.
References in periodicals archive ?
Following Alex Owen's case for The Place of Enchantment (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2004) in modernizing Britain, Corinna Treitel's location of occultism in an emergent "German modern" in A Science for the Soul (Baltimore, Md.
Their writing, art and other activities often explicitly rooted in occultism reveal that they formed a distinct group.
From the "Satanic panic" of the 1980s--spread by hucksters seeking fame and fortune through their extraordinary conversion stories--and the errors of Theodor Adorno in blaming occultism for the horrors of the Third Reich, to the "demonization of heresy .
Regardie was Crowley's one-time secretary and biographer, so provides an authenticity and serious tone to over a thousand pages of writings perfect for beginners as well as advanced Crowley students and any student of Golden Dawn or Occultism.
The revival of occultism in Germany produced new editions of Bulwer-Lytton's works, and ultimately The Coming Race was appropriated by a number of secret organizations in Germany in their formulation of an ideology of Ariosophy, a fusion of Aryan race doctrine, Nordic mythology and Theosophy" (xliii).
Whereas Victorian Britain had an obsession with seeing psychic phenomenon, there has always existed within occultism a true path, he suggests.
Grasset's L'Occultisme Hier et Aujourd'hui: Le Merveilleux prescientifique begins with a disclaimer of sorts; he is quick to discern the difference between occultism of the past, which he associates with mesmerism and spiritualism, and the occult, which he associates with the "marvelous": "Je limite l'occultisme a l'etude des phenomenes qui, 1[degrees] n'appartiennent pas encore a la science, 2[degrees] peuvent sans contradiction logique en faire partie plus tard (L'Occultisme 118) ["I limit occultism to the investigation of phenomena that, first, does not belong to science, second, that may without logical hindrance belong to it later on.
There are many repeated reports of the eccentricity of Rudolf II (1552-1612), whether in connection with politics or occultism.
The larger problem is that Lima has restricted his diachronic survey of occultism to the occurrence of this theme in theatrical works alone.
I learnt later that these came from the mysterious, illustrated book on occultism called The Sixth and Seventh Books of Moses, imported from a remote place called India, and with which readers of this column should be familiar.
This achievement, however, is dwarfed by his editing of the first three editions of the Encyclopedia of Occultism and Parapsychology.
However, as advances in the fields of pathology and dynamic psychology were made in the 1920s and 1930s, this interest waned, loosening the ties that had bound photography, occultism, and the paranormal at the turn of the century.