occult

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Related to occultism: Satanism

occult

 [ŏ-kult´]
obscure or hidden from view.
occult blood test examination by microscope or chemical test of a specimen (such as feces, urine, or gastric juice) for presence of blood that is not otherwise detectable. Feces are tested when intestinal bleeding is suspected but there is no visible evidence of blood.

oc·cult

(ŏ-kŭlt', ok'ŭlt),
1. Hidden; concealed; not manifest.
2. Denoting a concealed hemorrhage, the blood being inapparent or localized to a site where it is not visible.
3. In oncology, a clinically unidentified primary tumor with recognized metastases.
[L. oc-culo, pp. -cultus, to cover, hide]

occult

(ə-kŭlt′, ŏk′ŭlt′)
adj.
a. Medicine Detectable only by microscopic examination or chemical analysis, as a minute blood sample.
b. Not accompanied by readily detectable signs or symptoms: occult carcinoma.
v.intr.
To become concealed or extinguished at regular intervals: a lighthouse beacon that occults every 45 seconds.

oc·cult′ly adv.
oc·cult′ness n.

occult

Medspeak
adjective Not obvious; hidden; of unknown cause.

occult

adjective Not obvious, hidden, of unknown cause noun Paranormal dee-dee-dee–dee–dee-dee-dee–dee

oc·cult

(ŏ-kŭlt')
1. Hidden; concealed; not manifest.
2. Denoting a disease or condition (bleeding, infection) that is clinically inapparent, though it may be inferred from indirect evidence or identified by special tests.
See: occult blood
3. oncology A clinically unidentified primary tumor with recognized metastases.

occult

Concealed or hidden, especially of traces of blood in the faeces or sputum which can be detected only by special tests.

Occult

Not visible or easily detected.

oc·cult

(ŏ-kŭlt')
Hidden; concealed; not manifest.
References in periodicals archive ?
Following Alex Owen's case for The Place of Enchantment (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2004) in modernizing Britain, Corinna Treitel's location of occultism in an emergent "German modern" in A Science for the Soul (Baltimore, Md.: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2004), and Lynn Sharp's interpretation of nineteenth-century French spiritism as Secular Spirituality (Lanham, Md.: Lexington, 2006), John Wame Monroe sees a modern French religious landscape dotted by Laboratories of Faith.
The stage conceives a stranger, a sage, matters of occultism,
The occultism of the Nazis hasn't received the attention it should, especially in establishment education.
But here we find no mention of Armando Maggi's Satan's Rhetoric (2001), Gaetano Paxia's The Devil's Scourge (2002), Walter Stephens's Demon Lovers (2002), Nancy Caciola's Discerning Spirits (2003), Stephanie Moss and Kaara Peterson's Disease, Diagnosis, and Cure on the Early Modern Stage (2004), Erik Midelfort's Exorcism and Enlightenment (2005), or Robert Lima's Stages of Evil: Occultism in Western Theater and Drama (2005).
Regardie was Crowley's one-time secretary and biographer, so provides an authenticity and serious tone to over a thousand pages of writings perfect for beginners as well as advanced Crowley students and any student of Golden Dawn or Occultism.
Whereas Victorian Britain had an obsession with seeing psychic phenomenon, there has always existed within occultism a true path, he suggests.
There are many repeated reports of the eccentricity of Rudolf II (1552-1612), whether in connection with politics or occultism. We do not as yet understand the arguments of the chroniclers of the time, however, since the basis on which the character assessments were made seems slender in terms of real information.
The larger problem is that Lima has restricted his diachronic survey of occultism to the occurrence of this theme in theatrical works alone.
Maclean claims that Descartes 'was put off by any whiff of occultism; the current vogue for alchemy and magic [...] repelled him' (p.
I learnt later that these came from the mysterious, illustrated book on occultism called The Sixth and Seventh Books of Moses, imported from a remote place called India, and with which readers of this column should be familiar.
This achievement, however, is dwarfed by his editing of the first three editions of the Encyclopedia of Occultism and Parapsychology.
(Cambon's guest spirits had the grace to humour the mistress of the house in her ideas about art, politics and occultism; once, the famous psychiatrist Cesare Lombroso appeared in a seance in order to make amends for having been sceptical about spiritualism.)