occlusive dressing


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oc·clu·sive dress·ing

a dressing that hermetically seals a wound.

occlusive dressing

Wound care A dressing that seals a wound to preventing contact with air or moisture

oc·clu·sive dress·ing

(ŏ-klū'siv dres'ing)
Bandage that hermetically seals a wound.
References in periodicals archive ?
The purpose of this retrospective record review was to identify evidence that supports use of an occlusive dry sterile dressing compared to a petroleum occlusive dressing for preventing air leaks and wound infection at the CT site.
Four patients expired from the emboli, one of whom had a cerebrovascular accident, and none of them had occlusive dressings at the air entry sites.
In addition, this device, unlike suturing techniques, allows for the immediate intraoperative application of silicone to the surgical site so that it acts as an occlusive dressing, thus protecting the incision site from contamination.
Eighty-four percent of respondents reported that the only adverse events from vaccination were related to the skin irritation caused by the occlusive dressings worn over the vaccination lesion.
Advanced medical devices can be used, and the gold standard is the occlusive dressing because it protects the patient from self-manipulation.
This is followed by a careful examination of the chest and the sealing of open chest wounds with an occlusive dressing. Then it is necessary to identify casualties that require immediate advanced care.
Consider prescribing an antihistamine, moisturizer, topical steroid, antibiotic, or occlusive dressing.
It is likely that some "occlusive dressing effect" of topical corticosteroids used in inflammatory dermatoses may have something to do with this phenomenon because, in skin folds, topical corticosteroids stay longer and penetrate deeper, hence leading to a stronger clinical effect in interrupting formation of the rash.
(22) Proper coverage could consist of a semiocclusive or occlusive dressing such as film, foam, hydrogel, or hydrocolloid covered with stretch tape.
RFRs are taught to manage this injury by applying an occlusive dressing to the entry and exit wounds.