traumatism

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Related to occlusal traumatism by food: Occlusal trauma

traumatism

 [traw´mah-tizm]
1. the physical or psychic state resulting from an injury or wound.
2. a wound.

trau·ma

, pl.

trau·ma·ta

,

trau·mas

(traw'mă, -mă-tă),
An injury, physical or mental. Synonym(s): traumatism
[G. wound]

traumatism

/trau·ma·tism/ (traw´mah-tizm)
1. the physical or psychic state resulting from an injury or wound.
2. a wound or injury.

traumatism

(trô′mə-tĭz′əm, trou′-)
n.
1. The physical or psychological condition produced by trauma.
2. A wound or injury.

traumatism

Medspeak
(1) The mental or physical state caused by an injury or wound.
(2) An injury or wound itself.

Traumatism is not commonly used in the working medical parlance; trauma is widely preferred.

trau·ma

, pl. traumata, traumas (traw'mă, -mă-tă, -măz)
An injury, physical or mental.
Synonym(s): traumatism.
[G. wound]

traumatism,

n 1. an injury.
2. a wound produced by an injury; trauma.
traumatism by food,
n impingement of the gingival margin by coarse foodstuff caused by improper contour of the tooth or faulty position of the tooth.
traumatism by food, occlusal,
n lesions of the periodontium; caused by force placed on the tooth in excess of that which the supporting structures can withstand.
traumatism by food, periodontal,
n the application of stress to the structures constituting the periodontium exceeding the adaptive capacities of the tissues, with resultant tissue destruction.
traumatism by food, primary occlusal,
n force or forces caused by mandibular movement and resultant tooth percussion and capable of producing pathologic changes in the periodontium.
traumatism by food, secondary occlusal,
n destruction of the periodontium by factors other than those of occlusion (e.g., periodontitis). In secondary occlusal traumatism, even the forces of mastication become pathologic in nature.

traumatism

1. the physical state resulting from an injury or wound. See also shock.
2. a wound.

Patient discussion about traumatism

Q. Is it possible to get ADHD from suffering a traumatizing incident? lately, after the death of my Grandmother. I have been increasingly getting the symptoms of ADHD. I have suffered from some of the symptoms during my childhood, but now they are increasingly occurring. And I am finding it really hard to listen to Teachers, follow instructions and do coursework. Is it possible this was caused by the death of my grandmother?

A. I think you should look up depression. ADHD is something that does not “pop”, more reasonable to think is that you suffer from a slight depression. Check it out and see if it fits :
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/depression.html

Q. Save my husband. My husband was diagnosed with Bipolar disorder in 2001 but in 2003 traumatic events happened in our life due to a house fire, my husband was manic round the clock to the point where he was going to do harm to himself or someone else. I begged his doctor to institutionalize him to regulate his meds and to help him to deal with the traumatic thing that happened to us. But my doctor refused saying he couldn't do it against his will. No one would listen to my begging. Please help my husband. My husband ended up doing something that caused him to be in prison today, still not getting help. Is there anything I can do to help my husband to go to a place that will help him rather than making his mental state worse?

A. Take him to your local emergency room. tell the treage nurse you need to talk to a crisis worker. Go in with him and talk to the crisis worker about the things he has been doing and that he has bipolar disorder. Explain that he IS a danger to himself and others. They will probalbly want to speak with him alone but that is the best way to get him the help he needs. See if they can refer him to a mood disorder clinic to help him in the long run.
Stay strong and try to help him get the help he needs... Protect yourself in the meantime.

More discussions about traumatism