occlusal radiograph


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oc·clu·sal ra·di·o·graph

intraoral section film positioned on the occlusal plane and used in visualizing entire sections of the jaw; especially useful in exploring calcifications of the sublingual salivary glands.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

oc·clu·sal ra·di·o·graph

(ŏ-klūzăl rādē-ō-graf)
Intraoral section film positioned on occlusal plane and used in visualizing entire sections of jaw; especially useful in exploring calcifications of sublingual salivary glands and in viewing eruption patterns of teeth.
Synonym(s): occlusal film.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
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References in periodicals archive ?
Tooth-tissue-borne Tooth-borne expander expander n 16 15 Gender Male 7 8 Female 9 7 Age (years) Mean 8.06 7.46 Minimum 7 7.08 Maximum 10 10.58 Table 2--Rapid maxillary expansion: mean and standard deviation of the measurements made on pre-treatment (initial) and post-treatment (final) occlusal radiographs (dependent t-test).
Arita, "Comparison of the diagnostic performance of panoramic and occlusal radiographs in detecting submandibular sialoliths," Imaging Science in Dentistry, vol.
Panoramic and occlusal radiographs, which were taken when the patients were 7 to 12 years of age, were interpreted and used to determine if permanent teeth were missing.
When occlusal radiographs were compared to periapical ones, few differences were observed, suggesting the absence of superiority of any single type for the assessment of bone grafts [16].
Panoramic and Anterior Occlusal Radiographs, were used to determine the position of the impacted canine by parallaxing technique for patients having canine impaction.
Other radiographs, including anterior occlusal radiographs, were used to determine the position of the impacted canine by parallaxing.
The occlusal radiographs were taken preoperatively 3 days postoperatively and 1 3 6 12 18 and 24 months postoperatively.
Periapical and occlusal radiographs revealed the presence of a supernumerary tooth, located between the roots of the permanent central incisors, which was inverted and lying palatally, obstructing the eruption of 21 and also deflecting the eruption path of 11 (Figure 2).
No major changes then occurred in this techniques until Keyr, in Australia, in 1986 replaced the periapical radiographs with occlusal radiographs. This modification enables a greater tube movement and therefore a greater shift of the image of the image of the impacted tooth.