occlude

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occlude

 [ŏ-klo̳d´]
1. to fit close together.
2. to close tight.
3. to obstruct.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

oc·clude

(ŏ-klūd'),
1. To close or bring together.
2. To enclose, as in an occluded virus.
[see occlusion]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

occlude

(ə-klo͞od′)
v.
1. To cause to become closed; obstruct.
2. To prevent the passage of.
3. To bring together the upper and lower teeth in proper alignment for chewing.
4. To enclose a virus, as in an inclusion body.

oc·clud′ent adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

oc·clude

(ŏ-klūd')
1. To close, plug, obstruct, or bring together.
2. To enclose, as in an occluded virus.
See: occlusion
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

oc·clude

(ŏ-klūd')
1. To close or bring together.
2. To enclose, as in an occluded virus
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The assistant then instructs the patient to occlude into the VPS and keep occluding until the VPS sets.
In addition, an impression of the facial surfaces of the unprepared anterior teeth can be made to show how the anterior teeth look, by having the patient occlude the teeth, and placing fast-setting bite registration material on the facial surfaces of both the mandibular and maxillary anterior teeth (Fig.
Then, the assistant takes a bite registration by placing VPS on the abutment teeth and the edentulous ridge segments between them and having the patient occlude using the one unprepared tooth.
The abutment tooth is dried, the temporary is cemented onto the tooth, and the patient is instructed to occlude into the temporary to ensure that the occlusion is still perfect with the cement in place.
(18) The potential strategy for management of DH is to effectively occlude the dentine tubules.
Nevertheless, the mean number of occluded dentinal tubules measured in the Sensodyne treated group showed that the toothpaste could still potentially occlude dentinal tubules.
The agitation procedure cannot be used to predict the rate and the number of days in an oral condition required to completely occlude the tubules.
The search for an agent that would predictably and permanently occlude the tubules and blend with them has prompted the use of HAP which is the principal constituent of tooth.