occlude


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occlude

 [ŏ-klo̳d´]
1. to fit close together.
2. to close tight.
3. to obstruct.

oc·clude

(ŏ-klūd'),
1. To close or bring together.
2. To enclose, as in an occluded virus.
[see occlusion]

occlude

/oc·clude/ (ŏ-klldbomacd´) to fit close together; to close tight; to obstruct or close off.

occlude

(ə-klo͞od′)
v.
1. To cause to become closed; obstruct.
2. To prevent the passage of.
3. To bring together the upper and lower teeth in proper alignment for chewing.
4. To enclose a virus, as in an inclusion body.

oc·clud′ent adj.

occlude

See occlusion.

oc·clude

(ŏ-klūd')
1. To close, plug, obstruct, or bring together.
2. To enclose, as in an occluded virus.
See: occlusion

oc·clude

(ŏ-klūd')
1. To close or bring together.
2. To enclose, as in an occluded virus

occlude (ōklood´),

v to close together. To bring together; to shut. To bring the mandibular teeth into contact with the maxillary teeth.

occlude

to fit close together; to close tight; to obstruct or close off.
References in periodicals archive ?
A bite registration is a separate impression that uses just a bite registration material, and no tray, to capture an impression of how the patient's jaws occlude (an inter-occlusal record).
The assistant then instructs the patient to occlude into the VPS and keep occluding until the VPS sets.
Our observations provide evidence that Doppler auscultation may overestimate the effectiveness of a clinical procedure designed to occlude blood flow (for example, a tourniquet) and underestimate the actual amount of blood flow present.
Although effective when applied to the arm, the inability of the OHT to occlude arterial blood flow in the lower extremity, when tightened to a pain threshold, emphasizes the need for continued development of tourniquet systems that can meet weight and cube requirements without sacrificing effectiveness and safety.
In fact the question of whether we can enjoy the world we see without the experience of images or the world we hear without the experience of music seems to me pretty much a no-brainer - so much so that I cannot imagine a reason for categorizing any part of our involuntary, ordinary experience as "unesthetic," or for imagining that this quotidian esthetic experience occludes any "real" or "natural" relationship between ourselves and the world that surrounds us.