occipital lobe epilepsy

oc·cip·i·tal lobe ep·i·lep·sy

a localization-related epilepsy in which seizures originate from the occipital lobe. Symptoms commonly include visual abnormalities during seizures.

oc·cip·i·tal lobe ep·i·lep·sy

(ok-sip'i-tăl lōb ep'i-lep'sē)
A localization-related epilepsy where seizures originate from the occipital lobe. Symptoms commonly include visual abnormalities during seizures.
References in periodicals archive ?
Here, we describe a patient with evolving visual hallucinations and Capgras delusions for objects that developed secondary to new onset occipital lobe epilepsy.
To our knowledge, this is the first case to describe the cooccurrence of these symptoms in a patient with occipital lobe epilepsy. Other similar cases reviewed in the literature occurred in the context of primary psychiatric disorder diagnoses, dementia, and other neurodegenerative conditions [12-16].
Firstly described in 1879 in a patient with a parieto-occipital tumour [1], occipital lobe epilepsy (OLE) is still nowadays considered a rare condition that represents less than 2-13% of extratemporal epilepsies [2-5].
Duncan, "Parietal and occipital lobe epilepsy: a review," Epilepsia, vol.
Lin et al., "Intractable occipital lobe epilepsy: clinical characteristics, surgical treatment, and a systematic review of the literature," Acta Neurochirurgica (Wien), vol.
Quesney, "Occipital lobe epilepsy: electroclinical manifestations, electrocorticography, cortical stimulation and outcome in 42 patients treated between 1930 and 1991: surgery of occipital lobe epilepsy," Brain, vol.
Mattson, "Occipital lobe epilepsy: clinical characteristics, seizure spread patterns, and results of surgery," Annals of Neurology, vol.
Von Lehe, T Kral et al., "Surgical treatment of occipital lobe epilepsy," Journal of Neurosurgery, vol.
Thadani et al., "Intractable occipital lobe epilepsy: clinical characteristics and surgical treatment," Epilepsia, vol.
Wen et al., "Metabolic changes in occipital lobe epilepsy with automatisms," Frontiers in Neurology, vol.
* Occipital lobe epilepsy. This type usually begins with visual hallucinations, rapid eye blinking or other eye-related symptoms.
Case of simple partial status epilepticus in occipital lobe epilepsy misdiagnosed as migraine: clinical, electrophysiological, and magnetic resonance imaging characteristics.