occipital artery


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oc·cip·i·tal ar·ter·y

[TA]
origin, external carotid; branches, sternocleidomastoid, meningeal, auricular, occipital, mastoid, and descending.
Synonym(s): arteria occipitalis [TA]

oc·cip·i·tal ar·te·ry

(ok-sip'i-tăl ahr'tĕr-ē) [TA]
Origin, external carotid; branches, sternocleidomastoid, meningeal, auricular, occipital, mastoid, and descending.
Synonym(s): arteria occipitalis [TA] .

occipital artery

An end branch of the external carotid artery; it runs up the back of the scalp and supplies blood to the sternocleidomastoid muscle, the meninges, and the scalp. Its branches include the sternocleidomastoid, meningeal, auricular, and mastoid arteries.
See also: artery
References in periodicals archive ?
One thin vessel ramified from the occipital artery and one branch from cranial thyroid artery in rat (Santer and Owen, 1986; Mikusek et al., 1994), from the internal carotid and ascending pharyngeal arteries in rabbit (Chungcharoen et al., 1952) are contributed to the ganglion supplying.
The medial meningeal artery which was contributed to ganglion supplying in two roe deer was ramified from the internal carotid artery in one roe deer and from the occipital artery as reported by Nickel et al.
The temporal occipital artery when present was always a branch of inferior division.
According to previous published data, the separation of the vagus and the most rostral part of the cervical sympathetic interganglionic branch occurred distal to the distal ganglion of the vagus nerve at the variable distance in the pig (Sisson et al.) and some yaks, or rostral to the distal ganglion of the vagus nerve at the variable distance in most yaks and white yaks, or at the level of the atlantoaxial joint in the Bactrian camel (Cui-Sheng et al.) and some dromedary camels, or at the medial surface of the origin of the occipital artery in the horse and domestic ruminants (Habel; Sisson et al.), or medial to the parotid salivary gland in the sheep (May), or distal to the ventral pole of the CCG at the viable distance in most dromedary camels.
In a review of the world literature from 1644 published in 1998, Conner et al found only 386 reported cases of traumatic aneurysms and pseudoaneurysms of the face and temple, most of which were superficial temporal artery aneurysms.3 Only two of these cases involved traumatic pseudoaneurysms of the occipital artery.4 Previously eleven cases of traumatic occipital artery aneurysm has been reported.1, 5
Although the true incidence of traumatic pseudoaneurysms of the occipital artery is unknown, it is obvious that they are rare.
The final radiological diagnosis of post traumatic pseudoaneurysm arising from the left occipital artery with small area of thrombosis was made.
Patient underwent surgery with total excision of the pseudoaneurysm and ligation of the occipital artery. Patient came for CECT 2 weeks after surgery.
DISCUSSION: Given the continual improvements in medical imaging and diagnosis, which have increased the detection of all manner of diseases and conditions, pseudoaneurysms of the occipital artery remain extremely rare.
The occipital artery, on the other hand, is relatively protected throughout its course.