Obviousness

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The concept that the claims defining an invention in a patent application must involve an inventive step which, when compared with what is already known—the so-called prior art—would not be obvious to someone skilled in the art
References in classic literature ?
If selection consisted merely in separating some very distinct variety, and breeding from it, the principle would be so obvious as hardly to be worth notice; but its importance consists in the great effect produced by the accumulation in one direction, during successive generations, of differences absolutely inappreciable by an uneducated eye--differences which I for one have vainly attempted to appreciate.
It would, indeed, have been a strange fact, had attention not been paid to breeding, for the inheritance of good and bad qualities is so obvious.
On the view here given of the all-important part which selection by man has played, it becomes at once obvious, how it is that our domestic races show adaptation in their structure or in their habits to man's wants or fancies.
He takes the obvious course of keeping her at home and forbidding her to seek the company of people of her own age.
Angel began to call, for it was obvious that the matter should be pushed as far as it would go if a real effect were to be produced.
Well, of course it was obvious from the first that this Mr.
I trembled and consciously colored as she turned her big black eyes upon me with a look of obvious recognition entirely devoid of boldness or coquetry.
The course dictated by all this sense and sentiment was obvious.
From this sketch it appears that there is a material diversity, as well in the modification as in the extent of the institution of trial by jury in civil cases, in the several States; and from this fact these obvious reflections flow: first, that no general rule could have been fixed upon by the convention which would have corresponded with the circumstances of all the States; and secondly, that more or at least as much might have been hazarded by taking the system of any one State for a standard, as by omitting a provision altogether and leaving the matter, as has been done, to legislative regulation.
The simplicity and expedition which form the distinguishing characters of this mode of trial require that the matter to be decided should be reduced to some single and obvious point; while the litigations usual in chancery frequently comprehend a long train of minute and independent particulars.
If we could get the rest of that sheet it is obvious that we should have gone a long way towards solving the mystery.
It may be most obvious to you in the Greek e's, but to me there are many small points which indicate the same thing.