obturator nerve


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Related to obturator nerve: Nerve to obturator internus

ob·tu·ra·tor nerve

[TA]
arises from the lumbar plexus, conveying fibers from the second, third, and fourth lumbar nerves in the psoas muscle, crosses the brim of the pelvis, and enters the thigh through the obturator canal; it supplies muscles of the medial compartment of the thigh (adductors of thigh at the hip joint) and terminates as the cutaneous branch of the obturator nerve, supplying a small area of medial thigh above knee.
Synonym(s): nervus obturatorius [TA]

obturator nerve

a branch of the lumbar plexus that supplies the adductor region of the thigh.

ob·tu·ra·tor nerve

(ob'tŭr-ā-tŏr nĕrv) [TA]
Arises from the second, third, and fourth lumbar nerves in the psoas muscle, crosses the brim of the pelvis, and enters the thigh through the obturator canal; it supplies muscles of the medial compartment of the thigh (adductors of thigh at the hip joint) and terminates as the cutaneous branch of the obturator nerve, supplying a small area of medial thigh above knee.
Synonym(s): nervus obturatorius [TA] .

obturator nerve

A motor nerve originating in the lumbar plexus and composed of axons from spinal cord segments L2–L4. It passes into the thigh through the obturator foramen of the pelvic bones and innervates the adductor longus, adductor brevis, gracilis, pectineus, obturator externus, and adductor magnus muscles.
See also: nerve
References in periodicals archive ?
There are numerous reported variations in the number of branches and branch points for the obturator nerve (for example, anterior vs posterior vs main trunk).
Anatomic concerns also include branches from the femoral innervated muscles for whom trajectories are not clear, relative variability in innervation patterns to the anterior capsule in the presence of an accessory obturator nerve, accessory femoral nerve or superior gluteal nerve branches, the possibility of articular branches that start more inferiorly along the course of the femoral nerve and run with vessels, and a scenario where one common trunk supplies the joint, vessels, and muscles.
Variations include multiple branches from the nerve to the quadratus femoris, different trajectories through the greater and/or lesser sciatic notch, branches from nerves to the obturator internus or superior gemellus, and direct innervation from the sacral branches or obturator nerve.
Resection of the obturator nerve for analgesic treatment of degenerative-deforming changes of the hip joint.
Percutaneous radiofrequency destruction of the obturator nerve for treatment of pain caused by coxarthrosis.
CT-guided obturator nerve block for diagnosis and treatment of painful conditions of the hip.
Radiological anatomy of the obturator nerve and its articular branches: basis to develop a method of radiofrequency denervation for hip joint pain.
Anatomical observations on the accessory obturator nerve.
The accessory obturator nerve and the innervation of the pectineus muscle.