obturator internus

obturator internus

a muscle that covers a large area of the inferior aspect of the lesser pelvis, where it surrounds the obturator foramen. It functions to rotate the thigh laterally and to extend and abduct the thigh when it is flexed. Compare obturator externus, piriformis.
References in periodicals archive ?
3] clearly observed by surgery and reported that stretching of the obturator internus muscle compressed the sciatic nerve.
Other gluteal muscles, including obturator internus, may constrict the sciatic nerve, producing similar effects [5].
We present a previously unreported case of acute obturator internus and Obturator externus strain in an adolescent.
It passes through the following structures in the following order: gracilis, adductor brevis muscle, obturator externus muscle, obturator membrane, and beneath or through the obturator internus muscle and periurethral endopelvic connective tissue; it finally exits through the opened vagina.
I perform a similar hydrodissection under the urethra as I do in a retropubic procedure, though instead of injecting 5 cc's to the underside of the pubic symphysis on each side, I instead inject toward the obturator internus muscles.
Quadratus femoris (QF), piriformis, obturator internus, obturator externus, and superior and inferior gemelli are the deep external rotator muscles of the hip joint (Fig).
Similarly, a positive obturator sign of hypogastric pain on stretching the obturator internus indicates irritation in the pelvis which is performed by passive internal rotation of the flexed right thigh with the patient supine.
Variations include multiple branches from the nerve to the quadratus femoris, different trajectories through the greater and/or lesser sciatic notch, branches from nerves to the obturator internus or superior gemellus, and direct innervation from the sacral branches or obturator nerve.
crossing posteriorly to the obturator internus, gemelli and the quadratus femoris muscles (Williams et al.
CT examination of the abdomen and pelvis (with oral and IV contrast) demonstrated a large, complex, multiloculated fluid collection involving the left gluteal musculature, left illiacus muscle, left obturator internus muscle, left iliopsoas muscle, and the left iliopsoas bursae (Figures 2A, C and D) In addition, bone windows demonstrated erosive changes in the left sacroiliac joint (Figure 2B).
The ninth subject was diagnosed with acetabular osteomyelitis based on evidence of marrow and soft-tissue edema in the obturator internus muscle, away from the intervention site.
A thrombus in his internal jugular vein (Lemierre's syndrome) and an abscess in his obturator internus were subsequently found.