obturator externus

obturator externus

the flat, triangular muscle covering the outer surface of the anterior wall of the pelvis. It arises in several pelvic structures, including the rami of the pubis and the ramus of each ischium, and inserts into the trochanteric fossa of the femur. It functions to rotate the thigh laterally. Compare obturator internus.
References in periodicals archive ?
It passes through the following structures in the following order: gracilis, adductor brevis muscle, obturator externus muscle, obturator membrane, and beneath or through the obturator internus muscle and periurethral endopelvic connective tissue; it finally exits through the opened vagina.
The adductor muscle group consists of six different muscles: pectineus, gracilis, obturator externus, adductor brevis, adductor longus, and adductor magnus.
Once placed, the ends of the mesh penetrate the obturator membrane and obturator externus but not the adductor compartment of the thigh and groin.
The gluteals (maximus, medius, and minimus) and the "deep six" muscles of the hip (piriformis, quadratus femoris, obturator internus, obturator externus, gemellus superior, and gemellus inferior) serve to flex, extend, abduct, adduct, and medially or laterally rotate the hip.
The anchor goes not only into the obturator internus, but into the membrane and the obturator externus.
Among the muscles traversed, the adductor brevis is the first, followed by obturator externus and then internus.
After preparation of the space between the anteroinferior capsule and the psoas tendon, the ischium is approached proximal to the obturator externus muscle.