obturator


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obturator

 [ob´too͡-ra″tor]
1. a disk or plate that closes an opening.
2. a prosthesis for closing an acquired or congenital opening of the palate (cleft palate).
obturator sign pain on outward pressure on the obturator foramen as a sign of inflammation in the sheath of the obturator nerve, probably caused by appendicitis.

ob·tu·ra·tor

(ob'tū-rā'tŏr),
1. Any structure that occludes an opening.
2. Denoting the obturator foramen, the obturator membrane, or any of several parts in relation to this foramen.
3. A prosthesis used to close an opening in the hard palate, usually in a cleft palate.
4. The stylus or removable plug used during the insertion of many tubular instruments.
[L. obturo, pp. -atus, to occlude or stop up]

obturator

/ob·tu·ra·tor/ (ob´tu-rāt″er) a disk or plate, natural or artificial, that closes an opening.

obturator

(ŏb′tə-rā′tər, -tyə-)
n.
1. An organic structure, such as the soft palate, that closes an opening in the body.
2. A prosthetic device serving to close an opening in the body.

obturator

[ob′tərā′tər, ob′tyərā′tər]
Etymology: L, obturare, to close
1 a device used to block a passage or a canal or to fill in a space, such as a prosthesis implanted to bridge the gap in the roof of the mouth in a cleft palate.
2
Usage notes: nontechnical.
an obturator muscle or membrane.
3 a device that is placed into a large-bore cannula during insertion to prevent potential blockage by residual tissues.

ob·tu·ra·tor

(ob'tŭr-ā-tŏr)
1. Any structure that occludes an opening.
2. Denoting the obturator foramen, the obturator membrane, or any of several parts in relation to this foramen.
3. A prosthesis used to close an opening of the hard palate, usually a cleft palate.
4. The stylus or removable plug used during the insertion of many tubular instruments.
[L. obturo, pp. -atus, to occlude or stop up]

obturator

Any device, object or anatomical structure that closes or obstructs an opening or cavity.

ob·tu·ra·tor

(ob'tŭr-ā-tŏr)
1. A prosthesis used to close an opening in the hard palate, usually in a cleft palate.
2. Any structure that occludes an opening.
3. Denoting obturator foramen, obturator membrane, or any of several parts in relation to this foramen.
4. The stylus or removable plug used during the insertion of many tubular instruments.
[L. obturo, pp. -atus, to occlude or stop up]

obturator (ob´toorātur),

n a prosthesis used to close a congenital or acquired opening in the palate. See also aid, prosthetic speech.
Enlarge picture
Cleft palate obturator.
obturator, hollow,
n that portion of an obturator made hollow to minimize its weight.

obturator

a disk or plate that closes an opening, e.g. to close a cleft palate temporarily or permanently.

obturator muscles
the muscles that rotate the thigh laterally. See also Table 13.
obturator nerve degeneration
causes permanent obturator nerve paralysis (below).
obturator paralysis
commonly follows pressure on the obturator nerve during parturition; causes inability to adduct the thighs and the cow does the splits. When recumbent the legs are splayed with one on either side of the body.
Enlarge picture
Obturator paralysis. By permission from Sack W, Wensing CJG, Dyce KM, Textbook of Veterinary Anatomy, Saunders, 2002
References in periodicals archive ?
Life-threatening haemorrhage following obturator artery injury during transurethral bladder surgery: a sequel of an unsuccessful obturator nerve block.
Magnets are used as retentive aid for sectional dentures, hemi-maxillectomy, obturators, complete dentures or extensively atrophied ridges.
Obturator jerk (adductor reflex) due to contraction of adductor muscles, poses a major hurdle in safe and successful completion of TURBT under spinal anesthesia.
Jacobson (1967) described a technique using an acrylic obturator that engaged the undercut regions in the alveolar segments, which allowed passive molding of segments as growth developed.
Caption: Figure 1 Obturator oblique (A) and axial CT scan (B) of a patient with an intermediate size posterior wall acetabular fracture.
The result of an obturator for any prosthodontic application can be affected by the extent and site of postsurgical bony anatomy, availability of abutment teeth, magnitude of the defect, quality of the mucosa, radiation therapy, patient's previous dental experience and neuromuscular control of the patient.
This position of both hip joints resulted in a bilateral obturator dislocation.
There have been very few case reports in the literature of acute obturator internus or externus strains and to the authors' knowledge this is the first report involving both obturator internus and externus without other hip structure injuries (6, 7).
When passed from the outside-in, the needle is directed from a small incision lateral to the clitoris at the inferior edge of the adductor longus tendon, through the obturator foramen, around the ischiopubic ramus, and into the anterior vagina at the level of the midurethra.
Obturator Sign: passive internal rotation of the right hip while the patient lies supine.
I perform a similar hydrodissection under the urethra as I do in a retropubic procedure, though instead of injecting 5 cc's to the underside of the pubic symphysis on each side, I instead inject toward the obturator internus muscles.