obturator


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to obturator: obturator nerve, obturator artery, Obturator sign, obturator muscle

obturator

 [ob´too͡-ra″tor]
1. a disk or plate that closes an opening.
2. a prosthesis for closing an acquired or congenital opening of the palate (cleft palate).
obturator sign pain on outward pressure on the obturator foramen as a sign of inflammation in the sheath of the obturator nerve, probably caused by appendicitis.

ob·tu·ra·tor

(ob'tū-rā'tŏr),
1. Any structure that occludes an opening.
2. Denoting the obturator foramen, the obturator membrane, or any of several parts in relation to this foramen.
3. A prosthesis used to close an opening in the hard palate, usually in a cleft palate.
4. The stylus or removable plug used during the insertion of many tubular instruments.
[L. obturo, pp. -atus, to occlude or stop up]

obturator

/ob·tu·ra·tor/ (ob´tu-rāt″er) a disk or plate, natural or artificial, that closes an opening.

obturator

(ŏb′tə-rā′tər, -tyə-)
n.
1. An organic structure, such as the soft palate, that closes an opening in the body.
2. A prosthetic device serving to close an opening in the body.

obturator

[ob′tərā′tər, ob′tyərā′tər]
Etymology: L, obturare, to close
1 a device used to block a passage or a canal or to fill in a space, such as a prosthesis implanted to bridge the gap in the roof of the mouth in a cleft palate.
2
Usage notes: nontechnical.
an obturator muscle or membrane.
3 a device that is placed into a large-bore cannula during insertion to prevent potential blockage by residual tissues.

ob·tu·ra·tor

(ob'tŭr-ā-tŏr)
1. Any structure that occludes an opening.
2. Denoting the obturator foramen, the obturator membrane, or any of several parts in relation to this foramen.
3. A prosthesis used to close an opening of the hard palate, usually a cleft palate.
4. The stylus or removable plug used during the insertion of many tubular instruments.
[L. obturo, pp. -atus, to occlude or stop up]

obturator

Any device, object or anatomical structure that closes or obstructs an opening or cavity.

ob·tu·ra·tor

(ob'tŭr-ā-tŏr)
1. A prosthesis used to close an opening in the hard palate, usually in a cleft palate.
2. Any structure that occludes an opening.
3. Denoting obturator foramen, obturator membrane, or any of several parts in relation to this foramen.
4. The stylus or removable plug used during the insertion of many tubular instruments.
[L. obturo, pp. -atus, to occlude or stop up]

obturator (ob´toorātur),

n a prosthesis used to close a congenital or acquired opening in the palate. See also aid, prosthetic speech.
Enlarge picture
Cleft palate obturator.
obturator, hollow,
n that portion of an obturator made hollow to minimize its weight.

obturator

a disk or plate that closes an opening, e.g. to close a cleft palate temporarily or permanently.

obturator muscles
the muscles that rotate the thigh laterally. See also Table 13.
obturator nerve degeneration
causes permanent obturator nerve paralysis (below).
obturator paralysis
commonly follows pressure on the obturator nerve during parturition; causes inability to adduct the thighs and the cow does the splits. When recumbent the legs are splayed with one on either side of the body.
Enlarge picture
Obturator paralysis. By permission from Sack W, Wensing CJG, Dyce KM, Textbook of Veterinary Anatomy, Saunders, 2002
References in periodicals archive ?
It can be expected that the difficult needle passing through the obturator foramen may lead to complications, such as hematoma, bleeding, but it was only related to severe groin and leg pain in 32 women (6.
Obturator versus femoral nerve block for analgesia after total knee arthroplasty.
Search terms included hip joint, osteoarthritis, radiofrequency, femoral nerve, sciatic nerve, obturator nerve, hip joint anatomy, neurectomy, articular branch, joint denervation, coxalgia, pain, and hip joint anatomy.
While the TM doesn't specifically tell you to remove the spindle and obturator pad for cleaning, that is what was intended.
Transobturator MUS procedures are performed by 1 of 2 techniques, differing only in the direction the trocar is passed through the obturator foramen: the lateral to medial technique described by Delorme4 or the medial to lateral technique described by de Leval.
7,8) Other less frequently seen hernias include epigastric, ventral, obturator and hernias through the foramen of Morgagni.
1995), obturator internus (Testut, 1899), semitendinosus and semimembranosus muscles (Bergman et al, 1984; Le Double, 1884) have also been described as attaching to the sacrotuberous ligament (Figure 3 and 4).
Myofascial trigger points in pelvic muscles, including the levator ani, sphincter ani, and obturator internus as well as muscles of the urogenital diaphragm, often cause or contribute to chronic pelvic pain, said Ms.
The gluteals (maximus, medius, and minimus) and the "deep six" muscles of the hip (piriformis, quadratus femoris, obturator internus, obturator externus, gemellus superior, and gemellus inferior) serve to flex, extend, abduct, adduct, and medially or laterally rotate the hip.
facial trochlear optic phrenic axon dendrite occipital hypoglossal frontal mandibular nasociliary ophthalmic tibial laryngeal hillock bouton median splanchnic hypogastric femoral genitofemoral plexus pudendal myelin trigeminal abducens oculomotor vagus glossopharyngeal vestibulocochlear accessory auricular maxillary lacrimal supraorbital ethmoidal peroneal endoneurium synapse ganglion antebrachial acetylcholine ramus iliohypogastric subcostal obturator ilioinguinal oligodendrocyte nerve astrocyte
An obturator is used to prevent the baby's hard palate from closing improperly until he or she is old enough and strong enough to undergo corrective surgery.
Tenders are invited for Procurement Of Obturator To Designer Ref.