obtrusive

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obtrusive

(ŏb-troo′siv) [L. obtrudere, to thrust against]
1. Aggressively and unpleasantly noticeable.
2. Forced into one's awareness.
3. Starkly contrasted with the environment.
obtrusiveness (′siv-nĕs)
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References in periodicals archive ?
observed that Walter Scott "never reminds you obtrusively of the
Although head orientation performed better in some performance measures, electrical signals can be recorded less obtrusively and more reliably and may be the more practical choice as a user interface.
Lillian indicated her openness to learning but less obtrusively, through her interest in reading and sociology and 'the way changes come about'.
The Italian Chapel, still extant today, is disposed upon an obtrusively elliptic plan, and it is this chapel's ovaloid structure that is thought to have been an architectural model that ultimately triggered Kepler's astronomical discovery (Horsky 1990:189-190).
He interlaces the reticently and encompassingly Christian with the obtrusively irreverent and the heterodox.
One of the most important concepts brokers can impart to employers is that their employees' financial problems are their problems, too, and if they want their business to run smoothly, employers have to consider how to obtrusively help employees with their finances.
Steve didn't move the camera obtrusively, to accentuate any of the hard-hitting things that were happening in the narrative.
Furthermore, these facades were obtrusively cleaned using sandblasting which resulted in the removal of the patina of time and ended up with a flashy white stone elevation.
Although, in scenes of extensive visual and musical crosscutting, the density of the cues is essential; in other places they seem perhaps obtrusively copious, raising the question of how they might best be used in practice.
Applying, as suggested paradigmatically by Edgar Allan Poe's notorious purloined letter, the formula of the excessively obvious, the obtrusively self-evident clue placed before the eyes of the whole world, "Wakefield" can be read as a missive that has been turned like a (French) glove inside out, redirected and resealed.
Hatzantonis's statement that Kazantzakis "devotes the greatest part of his account to Spain's literature" (789) is evident merely from scanning the pages of Spain, which even obtrusively reference Don Quijote, Santa Teresa, Unamuno, and numerous other literary figures and authors.
Besides paper-and-pencil diaries, electronic diaries collecting data through new technologies such as smart phones could be done less obtrusively, especially with a large sample size.