obstruent

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obstruent

 [ob´stroo-ent]
1. causing obstruction or blocking.
2. an agent that so acts.

ob·stru·ent

(ob'strū-ĕnt),
1. Rarely used term for obstructing or clogging.
2. Rarely used term for an agent that obstructs or prevents a normal discharge, especially a discharge from the bowels.
[L. obstruo, to build against, obstruct]

obstruent

(ŏb′stro͞o-ənt)
adj.
Obstructing or closing natural openings or passages of the body.
n.
1. An obstruent medicine or agent.
2. Linguistics A sound, such as a stop, fricative, or affricate, that is produced with complete blockage or at least partial constriction of the airflow through the nose or mouth.

obstruent

1. causing obstruction.
2. any agent or agency that causes obstruction.
References in periodicals archive ?
We hypothesize that phonetic features concerning the place of articulation and voiced obstruents might play a key role in children's perceptual performance.
33) s-initial lenition forms selected after coronal obstruents, from ardsagart 'high priest'
In fact, a quantitative analysis conducted on men and women from Merida, Venezuela (Mora de Gonzalez, 1989) reveals that labial realizations of velar obstruents account for less than 1% of the occurrences.
These require listening for subtle changes in vowel length, vowel nasalization, and final obstruent devoicing.
Voiceless obstruents are voiced if they occur between two voiced segments:
CORR-SG compels correspondence between obstruents, even if they differ in [place] and [continuant].
KEYWORDS: Obstruents, spectrographic and auditory analyses, differences, similarities, acoustic.
The voiced spirants are clearly less complex than the sonorant stops despite the fact that the former are obstruents and hence normally regarded as stronger than nasals and liquids.
For instance, Benware states that it is not possible to have consecutive obstruents in the same syllable that differ in voicing, as in German habt, which inevitably assimilates to /pt/.
1 The coronal and dorsal obstruents commonly have strong coarticulations with the tongue-root features normally associated with vowels.
The weakening of obstruents in sonorous environments, especially between vowels, is a very common phenomenon in languages all over the world.
Palatal vowels, glides and obstruents in Argentinian Spanish.