obstruent

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obstruent

 [ob´stroo-ent]
1. causing obstruction or blocking.
2. an agent that so acts.

ob·stru·ent

(ob'strū-ĕnt),
1. Rarely used term for obstructing or clogging.
2. Rarely used term for an agent that obstructs or prevents a normal discharge, especially a discharge from the bowels.
[L. obstruo, to build against, obstruct]

obstruent

(ŏb′stro͞o-ənt)
adj.
Obstructing or closing natural openings or passages of the body.
n.
1. An obstruent medicine or agent.
2. Linguistics A sound, such as a stop, fricative, or affricate, that is produced with complete blockage or at least partial constriction of the airflow through the nose or mouth.
References in periodicals archive ?
The spirantization of stops to fricatives *K > *X word-finally and before an obstruent suffix has no parallel in Balto-Slavic, where the glottalic stops were implosives, as they still are in Sindhi (cf.
As we saw in (30)-(30d), the s-initial radical allomorph is selected after coronal obstruents: [a:rdsag[??]rt] 'high priest', [kosslu[??]] 'infantry'.
In fact, a quantitative analysis conducted on men and women from Merida, Venezuela (Mora de Gonzalez, 1989) reveals that labial realizations of velar obstruents account for less than 1% of the occurrences.
This approach to SCF can also account for the occurrence of syllabic obstruents in casual speech forms like suppose [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], and in this sense it is superior to syllabification-based approaches to SCF.
The second aspect encompasses the role of phonetic cues and the place of articulation of obstruents in the children's perceptual performance.
The prenasalized palatalised velar obstruent /n[g.sup.j]/ should be median.
Seven out of the eleven consonants are obstruents: /p, t, k, ?, x, h, ts/.
g i aaz i a * CORR-SG compels correspondence between obstruents, even if they differ in [place] and [continuant].
The aim of this paper is to describe the English obstruent consonants produced by Chilean University students of English.
Looking at the relevant consonants in terms of elements we can identify a class characterised by the presence of occlusion [?] unaccompanied by tone (H) - in other words, toneless stops; whether the stops are obstruents or sonorants is immaterial.
It should be borne in mind that, in the cases of column C of Table 4, C2 represents a specific subset of examples which, in spite of respecting the constraint of vocalic nuclei (see (4a)), do not agree with other important phonotactic constraints of EP, since they show codas potentially filled by obstruents or by sonorants unallowed in coda position.