obstinate


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ob·sti·nate

(ob'sti-năt),
1. Firmly adhering to one's own purpose or opinion, even when wrong; not yielding to argument, persuasion, or entreaty. Synonym(s): intractable (2) , refractory (2)
2. Synonym(s): refractory (1)
[L. obstinatus, determined]

obstinate

(ŏb′stə-nĭt)
adj.
Difficult to alleviate or cure.

ob′sti·nate·ness n.

ob·sti·nate

(ob'sti-năt)
1. Firmly adhering to one's own purpose or opinion, even when proven wrong; not yielding to argument, persuasion, or entreaty.
Synonym(s): intractable (2) , refractory (2) .
2. Synonym(s): refractory (1) .
[L. obstinatus, determined]
References in periodicals archive ?
Are you the strip of light glancing the wall, the obstinate refusal to quit or give in?
Senator Ernie Chambers, 70--irascible, obstinate but always passionate about the issues he cared about--is leaving after 36 years.
Cymdeithas Yr Iaith, Cymuned and the other voluntary groups working to protect and enhance the use of our language could do worse than employ this lady as an ambassador when trying to persuade obstinate private companies and businesses of the benefits of ensuring their customers can deal with them bilingually which ought to be the right of everybody living in Wales
Next time you have an obstinate pickle jar, stand it upside down in hot water and, hey presto, off comes the lid in a couple of jiffs.
NO-ONE at the Reebok quite knows what to expect in the Megson era but a return to a more obstinate time is surely guaranteed.
LORD HAVE MERCY, FOR WE PERSIST IN OUR OBSTINATE ways, and we close our hearts to you, hiding our shame behind our pride.
Bryant, as typical, remained obstinate about the fact that he only sat out four minutes of a 58-minute game, and said he had no concerns about taking on increased minutes and that the knee felt healthy.
In Dreamtime, to David van Teighem's stabbing music, the group staked out territory, their march having the ebb and flow of an obstinate tide.
Thus, she explains that a gender/sexual hierarchy is not a given, but rather "a peculiarly obstinate variable," "a constantly reenacted social process" with "mechanisms that reproduce sexual hierarchy in any social context" (180, 194, 261).
Near the end of the article, readers are left to believe that Hargreaves is not only in the wrong, but that he is too obstinate to acknowledge the error of his ways: "[Hargreaves] defiantly refuses to accept responsibility for the Gilder Dr.
Those who have to deal with the crisis often adopt a variety of predictable responses: obstinate or embarrassed silence, outright denial of the facts, retaliation, or scapegoating.