obstetric anesthesia

obstetric anesthesia

Etymology: L, obstetrix, midwife; Gk, anaisthesia, lack of feeling
any of various procedures used to provide anesthesia for childbirth, including local anesthesia for episiotomy or episiotomy repair; regional anesthesia for labor or delivery, such as by paracervical block or pudendal block; or, for a wider block, epidural, spinal, caudal, or saddle block. Anesthesia for cesarean section may be achieved with an epidural or spinal block or by general anesthesia.
References in periodicals archive ?
A spotlight on obstetric anesthesia in the developing world: Finally getting the attention it deserves.
Background: The laryngeal mask airway (LMA) is the most commonly used rescue airway in obstetric anesthesia.
Post-dural puncture headache is a significant cause of morbidity associated with the practice of obstetric anesthesia.
Now that PIEB pumps with PCEA capabilities are commercially available, many obstetric anesthesia practices are contemplating adopting this new technology.
A Practical Approach to Obstetric Anesthesia, 2nd Edition (online access included)
Dr Kohali Sellick's revisited--journal of obstetric anesthesia and critical care 2014:vol4, issue 2 page 57.
Maternal mortality and morbidity were significantly reduced by using neuroaxial blocks in obstetric anesthesia.
is the immediate past president of the Society for Obstetric Anesthesia and Perinatology, and is professor of the departments of anesthesia and critical care and of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Chicago.
Additional features include a rich multimedia library with podcasts and instructional videos, the TEE of the Month, the Article of the Month, video summaries of each monthly issue of Anesthesia & Analgesia, and Virtual Grand Rounds in Obstetric Anesthesia.
This text, published in 2011 by Oxford University Press, represents a second edition ten years after the initial release, in 2002, as the Handbook of Obstetric Anesthesia (Clinical References) with the same author group.
The American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) recommends that clear liquids be given to women with low-risk pregnancies during labor, and they report that there is no substantial evidence that supports fasting from solid food during labor (ASA Task Force on Obstetric Anesthesia, 2007).