obsolete

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Related to obsoleteness: obsolescence

obsolete

(ŏb′sə-lēt′, ŏb′sə-lēt′)
adj.
Biology Vestigial or rudimentary, especially in comparison with related or ancestral species, as the tailbone of an ape. Used of an organ or other part of an organism.

ob′so·lete′ly adv.
ob′so·lete′ness n.
ob′so·let′ism n.

obsolete

outdated, or no further use, gradually disappearing.
References in periodicals archive ?
The goal of the experience is to reflect about the problems of the national archival sector that have been influenced by obsoleteness and bad use of archive technology, as for example, Legislacion Archivistica Nacional and the conformation of study curricula of higher education institutions, especially the School of Archive and Libraries at Universidad Central de Venezuela.
For this obsoleteness that seems to resist the reader reveals, in its awkward and unwieldy style, the philosopher's struggle to rethink the philosophical categories from the bottom up.
In the final rule issued on October 27, 2000, the Librarian of Congress determined that only two classes of copyrighted works would be exempt from anti-circumvention liability, in accordance with [section] 1201 (a)(1)(B): "compilations consisting of lists of websites blocked by filtering software applications" and "literary works, including computer programs and databases, protected by access control mechanisms that fail to permit access because of malfunction, damage or obsoleteness.
The new Jesus-image of a social reformer continued to be the wellspring for the concept of Judaism's obsoleteness propagated by Christians of all denominations and utilized in missionary assaults against Jews.
See Gottfried, "Panajotis Kondylis and the Obsoleteness of Conservatism," Modern Age 39, no.
Operating lease is more favourable whenever leased equipment is exposed to risk of obsoleteness or the time span for which the equipment is leased is short, or the leased equipment is a common one, i.
Despite the ambitions of nineteenth- and twentieth-century nationalism, the idea of the nation-whether defined as an existing state or in nineteenth-century quasi-metaphysical terms-represents no such quantum, particularly when many nations give their own inflections to the same literary language, There is no distinct national character or essence for literature to express, even if we disguise the obsoleteness of the concept by rechristening it "cultural practices.