obsolescent


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

obsolescent

(ŏb′sə-lĕs′ənt)
adj.
Biology Becoming reduced during the course of evolution; vestigial or nearly vestigial. Used of an organ or other part of an organism.

ob′so·les′cence n.
ob′so·les′cent·ly adv.
References in periodicals archive ?
The half life of knowledge is about two yearsoin two years, half the body of knowledge of a specific field becomes obsolescent.
The argument that the current system will be technologically obsolescent in the next 15 years does not survive scrutiny.
If that's what passes for revisionism these days, I'll take the quaint, obsolescent stories in which the women actually get to speak, and it's the men who are silent.
What BVN has achieved is much more than a one-off intervention in an obsolescent office building.
This too has been replaced with a modern box, and we're told that soon even this will be obsolescent and surplus to requirements.
Parts of the superstructure involve reversion to obsolescent critical positions.
In passing, I did come across one puzzling passage: a reference to the Concerto di flauti by Alessandro Marcello, which the translation claims "must have been conceived for the enjoyment of a small group of amateurs who, it appears, were still playing the obsolescent recorder 'consort-style' in all its sizes from descant to bass well into the eighteenth century" (p.
Professor Dianne Hunter's book review entitled 'Juliet Mitchell, The Obsolescent Oedipus Complex, and the Decline of Patriarchy' also adds to this issue an invaluable and comprehensive review on how patriarchy perpetuates itself through the institution of the family.
And because "the progressive mind" controls the public space--the media, the schools, the libraries, the bookstores, the courts--even the British Army has been forced to concede and declare that the concept of "the enemy" is now obsolescent.
In 1970, Princeton theologian Paul Ramsey railed against in vitro technologies in a sobering book tided Fabricated Man; a year later, The Atlantic Monthly ran a story headlined "The Obsolescent Mother.
Early projections had print books becoming obsolescent by 2001, or losing haft their market to ebooks by then.
To the Editor: For an ME who was technologically obsolescent within six months of graduation, your magazine has been, over the years, a welcome fount of currency and updating.