obsolescent

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obsolescent

(ŏb′sə-lĕs′ənt)
adj.
Biology Becoming reduced during the course of evolution; vestigial or nearly vestigial. Used of an organ or other part of an organism.

ob′so·les′cence n.
ob′so·les′cent·ly adv.
References in periodicals archive ?
Patent information should be used as guiding principles for the development of proactive obsolesce management at every stage of the product life cycle with clarity on end-of-life (EOL) and/or end-of-support (EOS).
For example--THE LAWS OF EQUILIBRIUM: (a) Any input amplifies or intensifies some situation (inflates); (b) Obsolesces existing homeostasis or balance; (c) Recreates an older mode of equilibrium (e.g., Eliot-Auditory Imagination); (d) When pushed to its limits, the system reverses its modalities.
e further stressed on the need for the industry to brainstorm for technology identification in the backdrop of short shelf life and rapid obsolesce.
According to the ILO and the OECD, in the ITC sector, market uncertainties are relatively high due to: (1) globalisation, (2) the rapid development of new products thus dramatically shortening the obsolesce cycle, (3) the establishment of companies financed by short-term venture capital funding, (4) the ongoing and often misguided process of regulation in particular the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, (Lusk, Schmidt, & Halperin, 2006), and (5) failures in demand forecasts.
Isabel Stroun adds that the contemporaneity proclaimed by these ephemeral Pop culture references is precisely the cause of their rapid obsolesce. Taken au pied de la lettre Drummond's literary project is self-effacing to the point of being suicidal since his novels relinquish any claim to permanence through time (14).
Globalization and privatization have brought new work-relationships, job insecurity, insecurity regarding future working conditions and rapid obsolesce of the skills.
The quality of education is deeply affected by the infrastructure's physical wear and obsolesce, which impairs the quality of life of those working in this field; they are deprived of basic comfort and safety conditions, e.g.
c) The disposal of used computers is accelerated by the fast speed of planned obsolesce of computers making the life span of computers very short.
When a product is designed for obsolesce, to be thrown away when next year's model arrives, the energy and materials added during production--and the wastes generated--are only amortized over a single use.
As advances in technology continue to bring on obsolesce in a shorter period of time, the only way a company will be able to afford to maintain an updated system and hardware will be to pass the task of supporting the system and hard ware off to a third party and to share the cost with others.
The United States would "exploit and demonstrate the enduring economic advantages of the West to develop a variety of [arms] systems that are difficult for the Soviets to counter, impose disproportionate costs, open up new areas of major military competition and obsolesce previous Soviet investment or employ sophisticated strategic options to achieve this end." The objective was to make arms spending a "rising burden on the Soviet economy."