obscure

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obscure

(ŏb-skūr′) [L. obscurus, hide]
1. Hidden, indistinct, as the cause of a condition.
2. To make less distinct or to hide.
References in classic literature ?
"More fell than hunger, anguish, or the sea," down to the last obscure sea-dog of the "old model," having but few words and still fewer thoughts, there could not be found, I believe, one sailor who has ever coupled a curse with the good or bad name of a ship.
Thereupon they quickened their pace, avoiding high roads, and following obscure paths tending more or less northward.
This monstrous building is completely out of place in that location as it obscures the Thornaby landscape and it disfigures the vista of the riverside.
Rabbi Baruch Frydman-Kohl powerfully argued in a January edition of the Canadian Jewish News that, by so exposing and emphasizing the physical workings of the human body, Body Worlds in fact obscures the sacred.
When Elbaum glosses over this he obscures the real origins of the New Communists.
This simplification obscures numerous inalienable links between time and the events that unfold in it--links that bind us with the realm of quality and point to the true nature of things as they really are.
In Part 7 (pair), a Rorschach-like ambiguity in twenty-three-carat gold leaf, looking something like a detached human jawbone, hovers above another gory splash that again obscures the head of a nude male cadaver.
Meanwhile, Ventura's plan would reduce current state payments to cities and towns, a complex subsidy system that obscures the true cost of local services.
Bottom line, we live in a boundary-less universe where the intermingling of high/low art elements often obscures universal truth with transient fancy.
I observe that increasingly calendars are printed in a way that obscures the pattern of the week that Jews and Christians cherish, that is, from the first day (the Christian Lord's Day) to the seventh (the Jewish Sabbath), preferring to start on Monday with the five working days and finish with the weekend.
The very precise concern with details of punishment (with a fear of a return to punishment as public spectacle in the US), somewhat obscures more general and interesting issues about medieval and renaissance "spectacle," and a reading of depictions of the Passion that may frustrate the art and church historians, but attract some medics, while an interesting contribution to the history of punishment really requires more depth in chronicles or court records to satisfy social historians.