obscure

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obscure

(ŏb-skūr′) [L. obscurus, hide]
1. Hidden, indistinct, as the cause of a condition.
2. To make less distinct or to hide.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some obscurer films are Zero for Conduct and Torment.
This, as well as being unfair to Blackmore, Mallet, Bicknell, Home and obscurer versifiers such as Robert Holmes, author of Alfred, an Ode (1778), necessarily failed to take account of epic projects begun earlier than Cottle's and either given up or else still at the stage of being polished.
38) There are some interesting affinities between the shadow narrative around Offord's diplomatic career and that of a certain Lord Stair, the English ambassador who features in Saint-Simon and whose winning ways, as he insinuates himself into the company of key Parisian political figures, are described in the following terms: 'He wooed both men with praise and flattery; won the abbe with intrigues, and Canillac by sharing his interest in the obscurer forms of debauchery'.
Add for good measure the terrifying violence committed by a small minority of Muslims and magnified by intense media coverage, and it's easy to see why the obscure words of an obscurer monarch set the world on edge.
While famous items included Parmigiano Reggiano cheese from Italy and blue Stilton and Roquefort cheeses from England and France, respectively, among the obscurer selections were queijo de Azeitao, a cured, runny sheep's-milk cheese from Portugal, and Styrian pumpkin seed oil from Austria, which is often used in its home country to dress salads, pasta, and other dishes, and whose health benefits include an ingredient that assists in prostate health.
Though he draws on a few familiar sources--when dealing with the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries, for instance, John Aubrey is unavoidable-Gross primarily trawls the obscurer backwaters of memoir and biography.
There has been quite a bit of trimming of the text which means some of the obscurer characters have gone (no rival Pope Bruno, for example) but the pace is increased no end.