obligate

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obligate

 [ob´lĭ-gāt]
not facultative; necessary; compulsory; pertaining to or characterized by the ability to survive only in a particular environment or to assume only a particular role, as an obligate anaerobe.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ob·li·gate

(ob'li-gāt),
Without an alternative system or pathway.
[L. ob-ligo, pp. -atus, to bind to]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

obligate

(ŏb′lĭ-gāt′)
adj. (-gĭt, -gāt′)
Able to exist or survive only in a particular environment or by assuming a particular role: an obligate parasite; an obligate anaerobe.
n. (-gĭt, -gāt′)
An obligate organism.

ob′li·ga·ble (-gə-bəl) adj.
ob′li·gate·ly adv.
ob′li·ga′tor n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

obligate

adjective Necessarily; without alternative; required.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

obligate

adjective Necessarily; without alternative
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ob·li·gate

(ob'li-găt)
Without an alternative system or pathway.
[L. ob-ligo, pp. -atus, to bind to]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

obligate

Able to survive only in a particular environment. Used especially of certain parasites.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

obligate

(of an organism) being able to live only in one set of conditions. For example, obligate parasites such as the tapeworm require a host for completion of the life cycle; obligate aerobes such as man require atmospheric oxygen for respiration. Compare FACULTATIVE.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
(For example, a call option to buy a bond next month for $1,000 has the potential to become favorable to its holder--the market price of the bond could rise above $1,000 by then.) Likewise, to be a liability, such a contract must obligate a party to exchange on terms that are at least potentially unfavorable.
Examples include forward purchase and sale contracts, futures contracts and repurchase agreements that obligate both parties to a future exchange of financial instruments.