obligate anaerobe


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Related to obligate anaerobe: Anaerobic bacteria, Aerotolerant Anaerobe

anaerobe

 [an´er-ōb]
an organism that lives and grows in the absence of molecular oxygen.(See accompanying table.) adj., adj anaero´bic.
facultative anaerobe a microorganism that can live and grow with or without molecular oxygen.
obligate anaerobe an organism that can grow only in the complete absence of molecular oxygen.

ob·li·gate an·aer·obe

an anaerobe that will grow only in the absence of free oxygen.

obligate anaerobe

an organism that cannot grow in the presence of oxygen, such as Clostridium tetani, C. botulinum, and C. perfringens. Compare facultative anaerobe. See also anaerobe, anaerobic infection.

ob·li·gate an·aer·obe

(ob'li-găt an'er-ōb)
An anaerobe that will grow only in the absence of free oxygen.

obligate anaerobe

microorganism that cannot survive in normal oxygen levels

anaerobe

an organism that lives and grows in the absence of molecular oxygen.

facultative anaerobe
a microorganism that can grow with or without molecular oxygen.
obligate anaerobe
an organism that can grow only in the complete absence of molecular oxygen.
References in periodicals archive ?
Based on spectrum, clindamycin is most likely to be used to treat mycoplasma, obligate anaerobes, and aerobic/facultative-anaerobic gram-positive cocci.
Species Source Organism Cat (wounds) Pfizer (15) Bacteroides species Cow Francoz et al (17) Mycoplasma bovis Cow Chirino-Trejo and Obligate anaerobes Prescott (18) Dog (soft tissue) Pfizer (15) Staphylococcus aureus Dog (soft tissue) Pfizer (15) Staphylococcus intennedius Horse Jacks et all (19) Staphylococcus species Forward et al (16) Streptococcus agalactiae Human Forward et al (16) Staphylococcus aureus Human Forward et al (16) Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species Species [MIC.
Patients with chronic wounds feature complex flora including enterococci, Pseudomonas, obligate anaerobes, and Enterobacteriaceae.
15) The synergy between the two pathogens accounts for the aggressive nature of this disease; the removal of oxygen by the facultative aerobes allows the obligate anaerobes to flourish.
Other advantages include the ability to identify difficult-to-culture organisms such as obligate anaerobes that constitute a serious, and increasing, medical problem.
Only the organisms with no growth aerobically were considered as obligate anaerobes and others were considered as facultative anaerobe.