flattening

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flattening

A term of art used in psychiatry for the attenuation or reduction of a person’s emotional reactivity, typically expressed as flattening of affect.
References in periodicals archive ?
The present paper described the effects of the oblateness and radiation of both the primaries on the existence of resonance and the stability of the triangular equilibrium points of the planar elliptical restricted three-body problem in particular case when e = 0.
where [[zeta].sub.i] is the oblateness whose value depends on i.
At present, helioseismic measurements (see [section]6) indicate that the degree of solar oblateness may be slightly smaller [288, 289], but the general feature remains.
The high area-to-mass spacecraft's orbital evolution behaves strangely under the influence of the solar radiation pressure and the perturbation due to the oblateness of the Earth.
The absence of orbit-orbit resonances among the major moons in the Uranian system is thought to be related to the fact that the oblateness of Uranus is significantly less than that of Jupiter or Saturn.
Earth, which is less than 13,000 kilometers across the equator, has a much higher oblateness at about 27 kilometers.
This oblateness could be explained solely on internal cohesive forces and rotational motion in the LMH model ([section]4.4).
The French decided to test this theory (of oblateness) by measuring along the meridian--the scale of a degree of latitude should grow longer the further one moved from the equator.
He details how an "occulting layer" of mesosphere, about 87 kilometers thick, can account for the apparent added "oblateness" of the shadow when averaged over thousands of measurements and many eclipses.
However, Chicago amateur Curt Renz points out that neither method includes Earth's oblateness, which is about 0.3%.
Interestingly, Faye argued for the oblateness of the Sun based on the fluidity of the photosphere.
Schilling (Rand Corporation) wrote in the March 1965 Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences that a variation in the height of Earth's mesosphere (a zone from roughly 50 to 100 kilometers up) by latitude could explain the added oblateness of the shadow.