object

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ob·ject

(ob'jekt),
1. Anything to which thought or action is directed.
2. In psychoanalysis, that through which an instinct can achieve its aim.
3. In psychoanalysis, often used synonymously with person.

OBJECT

Urology A clinical trial–Overactive Bladder: Judging Effective Control and Treatment

ob·ject

(ob'jekt)
1. Anything to which thought or action is directed.
2. In psychoanalysis, that through which an instinct can achieve its aim.
3. In psychoanalysis, often used synonymously with person.

Object 

1. Something that has a fixed shape or form that you can touch or see.
2. Anything from which an image is formed by an optical system.
extended o. An object consisting of many point objects separated laterally to form a certain shape (e.g. trees, people). See beam of light; pencil of light; extended source.
o. plane See object plane.
point o. A small component of an extended object, in relation to an optical system. If the point object is situated on the axis of an optical system it gives rise to the axial ray and it is referred to as the axial point object.
real o. 
An object from which emergent rays diverge.
o. of regard See point of fixation.
o. space See image space.
virtual o. One towards which incident rays are converging after refraction or reflection. Example: a positive lens forms an image of an object placed beyond its anterior focal point. Introducing a mirror between the lens and the image makes that image become a virtual object. See virtual image.
References in classic literature ?
The relation itself is a part of pure experience; one of its 'terms' becomes the subject or bearer of the knowledge, the knower, the other becomes the object known"(p.
After mentioning the duality of subject and object, which is supposed to constitute consciousness, he proceeds in italics: "EXPERIENCE, I BELIEVE, HAS NO SUCH INNER DUPLICITY; AND THE SEPARATION OF IT INTO CONSCIOUSNESS AND CONTENT COMES, NOT BY WAY OF SUBTRACTION, BUT BY WAY OF ADDITION"(p.
However, revolutionary artists shook up that idea in the 20th century by bringing in existing objects to the world of art.
Although it's widely recognized that our concepts can differ in grainedness, the corollary question of whether objects can differ in grainedness has been little discussed.
Object detection, which not only requires accurate classification of objects in images but also needs accurate location of objects is an automatic image detection process based on statistical and geometric features.
Then look around the classroom and identify objects that use simple machines.
When searching objects, we do face two types of uncertainty causes: query uncertainty and object description uncertainty [6].
where [E.sup.s.sub.1] is the scattered field when only the background object exists and [E.sup.s.sub.2] is the scattering field when other objects (e.g., cloak and the object to be hidden) are introduced aside the original background object.
The new suite of Value objects now allow for more than just the binary, analog and multistate values to be represented in a network visible manner to other BACnet devices.
Object permanence, knowing that objects continue to exist when they cannot be seen (or touched, in the case of children who are blind) is one of the most important early developmental milestones (Fazzi & Klein, 2002).
These two orbs ought to be grouped with the swarm of other icy objects in the Kuiper belt, a region beyond Neptune that may contain millions of such bodies, Brown says.
Newton's three laws of motion describe the relationship between a force and the motion of an object. Sir Isaac Newton published the laws in 1687, but physicists still use them to predict how objects move.